Gov. Greg Abbott announced the reopening of a wide range of businesses and activities over the next several weeks, including many activities for children, at a press conference today. He also said that restaurants can increase capacity from 25% to 50%.


Abbott spoke about increased testing, strike teams deployed to hot spots such as nursing homes and meatpacking plants, and an ample supply of personal protective equipment as evidence that the state has made progress in fighting the coronavirus.

"Every decision I have made," Abbott said, "is unanimously supported by our team of medical experts."

Citing the need for child care if people return to work, Abbott said that child care facilities could reopen immediately, as can activities and clubs such as YMCA programs.

Also reopening immediately are personal care businesses such as massage and beauty treatments.

Beginning Friday, the following places (among others) can reopen at limited capacity:

  • bars
  • bowling alleys
  • bingo halls
  • skating rinks
  • rodeos
  • zoos
  • aquariums

On May 31:

  • summer day camps
  • summer overnight camps
  • summer school
  • professional sports (without spectators)

The measures will be delayed counties that have either seen a large increase in cases—such as areas around Amarillo— or are approaching hospital capacity, such as El Paso.

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