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In addition to extending the stay-at-home order first put into place last month, officials from Austin and Travis County announced today that they are adding a provision that requires people to wear fabric face coverings "when conducting essential work or activities," according to a news release from the city. It goes on:


"Everyone over the age of ten must wear a face covering over their nose and mouth when in a public building, using public transportation or ride shares, pumping gas and while outside when six feet of physical distancing cannot be consistently maintained. A face covering is not required when eating, riding in a personal vehicle, alone in a separate single space, or in the presence of other members of your residence.

Additionally, a face covering is not required when wearing one poses a greater mental or physical health, safety or security risk such as anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the cover without assistance."

The "mandatory fabric face coverings" do not need to be medical-grade masks or N-95 respirators, the city specified, which should be reserved for health care professionals and first responders.

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The Texas Department of State Health Services will allocate 332,750 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to 212 providers this week, with the bulk assigned to hub providers that are focused on widespread community distribution events. Six of those providers are in Travis County.

With the latest allocation of 16,450 sent to Travis County this week, the county will have received 104,275 doses of the vaccine. Local public health officials estimate that there are 285,000 area residents who fall in the 1A and 1B priority groups, meaning that around 37% of them should have access to doses seven weeks into the rollout process.

Here's where the latest allotment is going:

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The California exodus has made headlines for several years now, and even more recently, with thousands of West Coasters seeking tax relief, less-expensive real estate and a simpler lifestyle in Texas' capital city.

However, a California man's scathing review of Austin, which was published in Business Insider on Wednesday, reveals that some are less than satisfied with their move.

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Austin may soon be home to a tech plant that would dwarf the Tesla Gigafactory in both investment and job creation.

Samsung Electronics Co. is considering starting construction on a $10 billion memory chip plant in Austin as soon as this year, Bloomberg reported Friday.

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