Never miss a story
Sign up for our free daily morning email...
...and afternoon text update
×
(Earl McGehee/CC)

Finding affordable housing just got a little bit easier in Austin. The City of Austin launched a searchable, interactive map showing income-restricted housing units all over the city with just a few clicks.


The map, unveiled Tuesday, asks for the user's annual income and number of people living in their house, revealing a map of affordable housing. The map includes contact info, listed amenities, schools and acceptance criteria.

The database has 491 buildings with 33,067 units total in the database.

According to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, there are certain median family income requirements that must be met in order to qualify for those developments.

The city had originally intended to create a comprehensive list of those in need of affordable housing, placing them in as units became available, but the idea was abandoned due to needing more data on residents.

The map, which comes in response to a need to effectively connect Austin residents to low-income resources, will be updated continually by a third party.

Unfortunately, the map is not without its shortcomings; the map alerts when there is a waitlist but doesn't let the user add their name to the waitlist and the map does not show vacancies, meaning there is no seamless way to check for available units.

However, HUD is still working its way through the pitfalls. City council member Greg Casar said he is urging fellow staff members to look into how Austin could be more preemptive in connecting those in need to resources that can help.

Popular

Citing a 77% decline in new COVID cases nationally since early January, Dr. Martin Makary, a surgical oncologist and professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, expects COVID-19 "will be mostly gone by April, allowing Americans to resume normal life."

Keep Reading Show less

(Bob Daemmrich)

Travis County is the ninth most at-risk county in the nation for severe vaccine deficits and the second most at-risk in the state, according to a study by data science company Cogitativo.

Keep Reading Show less

Late (Tuesday) the City of Austin's outside attorney filed a response to the plaintiffs' (called relators in legal terms) request for a writ of mandamus to force the City Council to amend ballot language for Proposition B.

Proposition B will be on the May 1 ballot as a result of Save Austin Now's petition drive. If voter approved, the resulting ordinance would ban: camping in a public areas, soliciting in designated areas and sitting or lying down on public sidewalks.

Read the full story at The Austin Bulldog.