(Earl McGehee/CC)

Finding affordable housing just got a little bit easier in Austin. The City of Austin launched a searchable, interactive map showing income-restricted housing units all over the city with just a few clicks.


The map, unveiled Tuesday, asks for the user's annual income and number of people living in their house, revealing a map of affordable housing. The map includes contact info, listed amenities, schools and acceptance criteria.

The database has 491 buildings with 33,067 units total in the database.

According to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, there are certain median family income requirements that must be met in order to qualify for those developments.

The city had originally intended to create a comprehensive list of those in need of affordable housing, placing them in as units became available, but the idea was abandoned due to needing more data on residents.

The map, which comes in response to a need to effectively connect Austin residents to low-income resources, will be updated continually by a third party.

Unfortunately, the map is not without its shortcomings; the map alerts when there is a waitlist but doesn't let the user add their name to the waitlist and the map does not show vacancies, meaning there is no seamless way to check for available units.

However, HUD is still working its way through the pitfalls. City council member Greg Casar said he is urging fellow staff members to look into how Austin could be more preemptive in connecting those in need to resources that can help.

The challenge for all of us this Thanksgiving is letting go of what we've lost in this tough year and treasure what we still have.

We at Austonia are thankful for you. Since we launched our site in April, we've done our best to connect you to Austin, with stories ranging from the important to the delightfully superficial. Your response has been strong and we are grateful.

At this time of thanks, we have a variety of stories for you. Laura Figi writes about "a greener holiday," food trends, and Friday shopping. Emma Freer writes about a nearby annual Native American heritage celebration. And Roberto Ontiveros brings us a thoughtful piece that looks at the human toll of Austin's gentrification—the often painful flip side to having shiny new bars, restaurants, and apartments—in this case it's displacement of the Black community on East 11th Street. Finally, we ask you how you're celebrating the holiday this year.

Our best to you and your loved ones!

—The Austonia Team

You can now buy earrings designed by UT students at Kendra Scott

Small businesses have struggled through a long and arduous year, working to keep their livelihood afloat in a sea of uncertainty. This holiday season poses the opportunity to not only give gifts to your favorite people but also give back to your favorite local artists, Austin icons and small businesses.

Keep Reading Show less

Aztec dancers perform as part of the virtual grand finale of the Sacred Springs Power on Nov. 21.

Normally, the Sacred Springs Powwow draws a crowd of thousands to San Marcos, where it is hosted each year by the Indigenous Cultures Institute.

But this year's event, like so many others, occurred online. Sixty Native American dancers competed via streamed performances on Saturday, and vendors, singers and storytellers submitted videos for the audience to view at their leisure.

Keep Reading Show less
(Isabella Lopes/Austonia)
Austin's East 11th Street, with its brunch crowds and boutiques, is a slick and shining example of the gentrification that has taken over what was once designated by the city as the old "negro district."
Keep Reading Show less
(Marco Verch/CC)

The holiday season is the most wonderful time of year; Christmas trees, Thanksgiving feasts, good will toward men and holiday movies never cease to warm up the coldest season. However, no matter how wonderful it is, it's also a very wasteful time of year. Tinsel, paper snowflakes, single-use wrapping paper, excess food, Amazon boxes and cranking up the heat have an impact on the planet.

Keep Reading Show less
Create your own user feedback survey