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Critics of Mayor Steve Adler gathered on Sunday for a drive-thru protest and parade in the interest of recalling the Austin mayor and supporting the police.


The group gathered at South Austin's Burger Stadium at 12:30 p.m. clad with "Trump 2020," "Recall Mayor Adler" and "Back the Blue" signs and flags plastered on their cars. After driving around the city, stopping by the Texas State Capitol, the group ended their parade at Austin Police Department headquarters around 3 p.m.

A group of APD officers are facing criticism for appearing in pictures with protesters displaying white supremacist hand signals in front of City Hall.

The group told KVUE that APD was notified about their planned demonstration.

Austin Police Association President Ken Cassaday released a statement in regards to the event:

"If these officers were aware of the behavior of those on the fringe of the group, there is no doubt in my mind that they would not have participated in the picture. The Austin Police Association and our members, including the pictured officers, condemn any type of racist behavior."

Trump supporters also gathered separately near Lake Travis on Sunday for a drive-along caravan on FM 620. Trump supporters have gathered in the area before—in September, a lake parade in support of Trump caused several boats to sink.

Adler's office responded to the Sunday events with a statement that the mayor had no response and was "out looking at new opportunities for getting people out of tents and into homes."

(Texas Longhorns/Instagram)
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(Tito's Handmade Vodka)

Ingredients:

  • 750 mL Tito's Handmade Vodka
  • 1 1/2 cup toasted pecans
Directions: Toast pecans in a 350°F oven until they become aromatic (about 5 minutes). Let pecans cool, drop them into a resealable jar, and fill with Tito's Handmade Vodka. Store in a cool, dark place for 1 month, if you can wait that long.
(MangoNic/Shutterstock)

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Now, the private practice conducts almost all of its visits virtually, either over the phone or on HIPAA-compliant video platforms.

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We at Austonia are thankful for you. Since we launched our site in April, we've done our best to connect you to Austin, with stories ranging from the important to the delightfully superficial. Your response has been strong and we are grateful.

At this time of thanks, we have a variety of stories for you. Laura Figi writes about "a greener holiday," food trends, and Friday shopping. Emma Freer writes about a nearby annual Native American heritage celebration. And Roberto Ontiveros brings us a thoughtful piece that looks at the human toll of Austin's gentrification—the often painful flip side to having shiny new bars, restaurants, and apartments—in this case it's displacement of the Black community on East 11th Street. Finally, we ask you how you're celebrating the holiday this year.

Our best to you and your loved ones!

—The Austonia Team

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(Isabella Lopes/Austonia)
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