(Isabella Lopes/Austonia)

Most people are familiar with Brazilian foods from experiences at steakhouses, but Brazil's cuisine has more to offer than an overpriced meal at an expensive restaurant.

If you're looking to try out some authentic Brazilian food without breaking the bank, these are some must-try places in Austin.



Boteco (1209 East 6th St. suite A)

Boteco is the perfect place to get a taste of various Brazilian favorites. The menu features all different types of popular Brazilian street foods, including coxinhas, yuca fries, pastel and features a picanha grelhada dish.

As most people are aware of, Brazilians love eating meat, especially picanha, a popular cut of beef in Brazil made by the top sirloin cap. You can regularly find this cut of meat at Brazilian steakhouses, but give picanha grelhada at Boteco a try if you are looking for the perfect Brazilian lunch. The dish itself includes rice, beans, caramelized onions, farofa, vinagrete, a fried egg and picanha.

Boteco also offers a variety of other street foods, including appetizers of coxinhas, pastel and yuca fries. Yuca fries are widely popular as an appetizer and french fry replacement in Brazil. The fries are made by deep frying yuca, a staple root in Brazilian cuisine.

If you are looking for something a bit more filling, try a coxinha, the Brazilian version of chicken croquette. Filled with shredded chicken and cream cheese, after your first crunchy bite of this popular food you'll want to order more.

Once you are done trying out the savory dishes at Boteco, order some Açaí, topped with strawberries, granola and powdered milk for the perfect Brazilian dessert.

Espadas de Brazil (2512 Rio Grande St.)

Espadas de Brazil is the first rodizio on wheels in Austin.

Rodizio, an all-you-can-eat style of service at restaurants, can be found mainly at Brazilian steakhouses. If you are wanting to try quality Brazilian style steak cuts at an affordable price, this is a must-try.

Espadas de Brazil offers many different types of sandwiches and plates with a Brazilian twist. The picanha sandwich and the Gaucho plate are the most popular dishes at the food truck, but don't forget to try an order of yuca fries or pao de queijo, which is a cheese bread treasured in Brazil.

After trying out so many Brazilian dishes, you'll want to have your cafe da tarde, also known as afternoon coffee. Cafe da tarde is a meal between lunch and dinner, and often includes coffee, bread, cakes and pastries.

Pastelaria São Paulo (2512 Rio Grande St.)

Most cultures have their own version of an empanada, and in Brazil, pastel is just that. It's one of the most beloved and well-known street foods. Pastel is a flour dough "pastry" filled with different toppings and fried. Once you've tried one, you won't want to stop.

Although mainly eaten as a savory dish in Brazil, pastels can be customized to fit all food groups. Popular fillings include cheese, ground beef with green olives and onions, chicken with cream cheese, hearts of palm and guava with mozzarella for dessert.

You can find all of these different types of pastels at Pastelaria São Paulo. Pair your pastel of choice up with a Guarana, a popular Brazilian soft drink for the ultimate Brazilian experience.

Edis Chocolates (3808 Spicewood Springs Road Ste 102)

Edis Chocolates has a range of different Brazilian savory pastries, such as coxinhas, pão de queijo, esfihas, empadas and kibe as well as brazilian cakes and more.

The bakery is run by a Brazilian mother-daughter duo and has been operating in Austin for nine years. You can stop by Edis Chocolates to get all of your chocolate cravings as well as enjoy a coffee break with delicious Brazilian pastries.


All of the listed are Brazilian owned and have proven to be the real deal of authentic Brazilian food. If you haven't tried yuca fries or are looking to try a completely new food group, it is a guarantee that you need to visit one of these food places for the best Brazilian food in Austin.

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