(City of Austin)

This story was updated at 11:30 p.m. with the final election results.

With all votes tallied, Council Member Leslie Pool has been re-elected to her District 7 seat on Austin City Council, with 67.25% of votes.


Her urbanist opponent Morgan Witt received 32.75% of votes.

District 7, which includes parts of north central Austin, is one of five of Austin City Council's 10 seats up for election this year. In her next term, Pool will be tasked with the ongoing rewrite of the city's land use code, making further cuts to the Austin Police Department's budget, and—with voter approval of Proposition A—implementing the $7.1 billion Project Connect transit plan.

As a council member, Pool's priorities have included environmental sustainability and preserving Austin neighborhoods' character. She supported the council's recent effort to reimagine public safety by reallocating police funds toward other city services as well as the decision to overturn the camping ban.

"My vote to decriminalize homelessness … was both a moral decision and a policy decision," she recently told Austonia.

Pool outraised her opponent by a wide margin, with around $63,000 in donations, compared to Witt's $18,000, according to the latest round of campaign finance reports.

Witt, a renter who claims to be the "truly progressive" candidate, supports improving mobility and reforming Austin's zoning code to allow for more diverse housing stock.

She supports the council's June 2019 decision to overturn the camping ban and told Austonia last month that, if elected, she would focus on freeing up housing assets for homeless residents in the short term and investing in homelessness prevention in the long term.

Travis County saw record voter turnout this election, with 40,530 District 7 residents casting a ballot in this year's race, compared to 29,757 in 2016.

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