(Bob Daemmrich)

It's Election Day, and nearly 65% of Austin voters have already cast a ballot before the day began.

Short lines made it easy to vote on Election Day in Austin. There will also be Election Day watch parties, mostly virtually, taking place after polls close.

Here is the latest election information:


11:30 a.m.: Local election results are in

Election results are complete for Travis County with two council races headed for the Dec. 15 runoffs. And along with those results, the city learns Proposition A—a 15-year, $7.1 billion overhaul of the local transit system—passed.

Read about the results council results here, and the local mobility propositions here.

9:05 p.m.: Presidential race too close to call in Texas

Most of Travis County presidential votes have been counted, but an estimated one-quarter of all Texas votes are yet to be counted so far.

For ongoing vote totals for the Texas presidential race, click here.

8:50 p.m. John Cornyn retains U.S. Senate seat

U.S. Sen. John Cornyn has been elected to his fourth term after beating Democratic challenger MJ Hegar, Texas Tribune projects. Here is more background about the U.S. Senate race.

8:10 p.m. Early voting results for Prop A & B as well as U.S. Senate, House races in Texas

Project Connect and the Prop B mobility bond both have significant leads based on early voting results released Tuesday night.

And, at least in Travis County, challenger MJ Hegar leads U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, in local early voting totals. There are also several local U.S. House races that already have significant returns recorded. Most notably, challenger Wendy Davis leads District 21 incumbent U.S. Rep. Chip Roy, R-Texas.

7:20 p.m. Polls close quietly at The University of Texas campus and at Austin Central Library

The University of Texas had no lines at campus polling locations after polls opened Tuesday morning.

Joe Lanane

There were no reported lines at The University of Texas campus or Austin Central Library in downtown Austin, two of the highest-profile polling locations in the city.

5:05 p.m.: 43,000 have voted in-person on Election Day with two hours left to go

Travis County voters cast their ballots at the Southpark Meadows Shopping Center location in far south Austin during the highly anticipated 2020 general election.

(Bob Daemmrich)

With two hours left to vote and many Austinites getting off work for the day, more than 43,000 Travis County residents have cast their ballot on Election Day, according to the Travis County clerk.

Most of the 178 Travis County polling locations report little to no wait times for voters to cast a ballot.

As of 5 p.m., only one site, Old Quarry library branch in Northwest Hills, reports an extended wait time. It reportedly will take at least 50 minutes to cast a vote at this location, although similar county reports have proven to be unsubstantiated when reviewed earlier in Election Day.

The only other county polling site reporting a delay is located in Manor, where a 50-minute-plus wait is also reportedly occurring.

​​​​4 p.m.: North-central polling sites have no wait times

(Joe Lanane/Austonia)

St. Matthew's Episcopal Church in Northwest Hills has only had approximately 200 votes on Election Day.

Polling locations in north-central Austin have little to no wait times for voters mid-afternoon.

According to one campaign worker in front of St. Matthew's Episcopal Church in Northwest Hills, approximately 200 people have voted at the polling location so far today.

Another nearby spot, St. John's United Methodist Church in Allandale, also reported no wait times despite short-lived reports from Travis County that voters were waiting at least 20 minutes to cast a ballot.

Another common Election Day polling location, Congregation Beth Israel in Rosedale, had little activity as well, according to one on-site petitioner.

There may not be any polling sites in Austin's central core reporting extended wait times as of late Tuesday afternoon.

If you want to rock the vote in style, consider stopping by Austin Central Library from 6-7:30 p.m. to enjoy live music while casting a ballot. Jack Craver of Austin Politics Newsletter reports Progress Texas is hosting live music at polling sites across Austin on Election Day.

2:50 p.m.: Election Protection group reports no issues at Austin-area polling sites

(Joe Lanane/Austonia)

A volunteer for Election Protection reports no major issues at Austin-area polling locations during Election Day.

Despite reports of a brief wait on Travis County's wait time map, the polling site at Juan P. Navarro Early College High School had no wait time mid-afternoon.

A volunteer from Election Protection, a polling site watch group, reports no major issues at Austin-area polling locations. Election Protection is a national, nonpartisan coalition of various nonprofit and advocacy groups that seek to protect and defend the right to vote.

1:30 p.m.: Petitions to recall Austin Mayor Steve Adler circulating at Ben Hur polling location

Joe Lanane

Austin native Jason Scott directs potential voters to the Ben Hur polling location near West Anderson Lane in north central Austin. He is volunteering for an initiative to recall Austin Mayor Steve Adler.

Ben Hur Shrine Temple in north-central Austin is also reporting slow lines, with more poll workers and campaign volunteers than voters.

However, one notable difference at this location is a campaign to recall Austin Mayor Steve Adler. The Adler recall initiative reportedly needs 61,000 valid signatures by January to qualify for a May mayoral recall election.

At least two people signed the petition on their way to vote after the lunch hour.

Jason Scott, who supports the recall initiative, was on West Anderson Drive on Tuesday waving a sign pointing voters toward the Ben Hur polling location. Some people honked, he said, while others gave him a thumbs down in response to the recall effort.

The Austin-born resident said he disagreed with Adler's decision to close down Austin during the pandemic. He also criticized the lift on Austin's camping ban.

"It's really a bad case of mismanagement," Scott said. "Just watch, there's about to be a big change politically."

Locally owned businesses have suffered most during quarantine measures, Scott said, while big-box national stores such as Walmart have benefited.

"We need to be able to restart the economy," he said.

12:15 p.m.: Lines remain short at most Austin voter locations, including spots with a reported wait

There were no lines at Greater Mt. Zion Baptist Church in East Austin despite reports of longer-than-usual waits at the polling location.(Joe Lanane)

Despite claims earlier in the morning that lines at Greater Mt. Zion Baptist Church were 20-50 minutes long, according to Travis County's wait time map, a poll worker at the site reports "relatively mild turnout" and no extensive wait times. The poll worker attributed the inaccurate report to a potential tech glitch in how they report wait times to the county.

The wait time map has since been updated heading into the noon hour to show that almost all polling locations in Travis County have short wait times between zero and 20 minutes. Only Avalon Pool and Amenity Center in Pflugerville reports an excessive wait time of 50 or more minutes. No other polling site reports wait times that exceed 20 minutes.

At other polling locations throughout Austin, voters could walk in almost immediately to cast a ballot.

10:20 a.m.: First-time poll worker reports no lines at Twin Oaks library branch

Poll workers set up outside of Twin Oaks library branch in South Austin on Election Day.Joe Lanane

Nothing unexpected has occurred so far at the Twin Oaks library branch in South Austin. A first-time poll worker, who declined to give their name, said they are glad to work the polling site to ensure there are more than enough voting locations open on Election Day.

"It's a generational handing of the baton because this position is usually served by retired people and the elderly," the poll worker said. "I felt like this was a call to action, and other than voting it just feels very hopeful to participate."

10 a.m.: South Austin house becomes pickup spot for Texas Democrats

Caitlin Gabor, right, hands out campaign literature to volunteers at a Texas Democrats pickup spot in South Austin.(Joe Lanane/Austonia)

Between two South Austin polling sites is an unofficial pickup spot for Texas Democrats volunteering today. Volunteer Caitlin Gabor is working a makeshift work station to hand off campaign literature to workers—who then will work the neighborhoods to target voters who have not yet cast ballots. Gabor said this is her first time engaging in political activity.

Volunteers, who come and go from the South Austin home, picking up campaign pamphlets, report that many voters still benefit from information about polling locations and how to cast a vote during COVID-19.

9:40 a.m.: South Austin Recreation Center has no lines after morning rush

Outside of the South Austin Recreation Center, located near the South Lamar Boulevard-Oltorf Street intersection, was reportedly busy when polls opened Tuesday morning but has since died down.

Gloria and Charles Saucedo campaign outside of South Austin Recreation Center on Election Day.Joe Lanane

Gloria Saucedo and her husband Charles, have set up outside of the recreation center to support Gloria's sister, Austin ISD District 2 candidate Ofelia Maldonado Zapata. The polling location is located in AISD District 2, Gloria said, and her sister is one of three candidates running for the open seat.

The couple anticipates more voters to arrive after the work day concludes around 5:30 p.m. Polls close at 7 p.m.

8:40 a.m.: East Austin polling site has no lines

Cinque Kiara sells t-shirts benefiting Carment Kiara's Youth Organization outside Carver library branch in East Austin. (Joe Lanane/Austonia)

Cinque Kiara sells custom T-shirts that encourage voting while standing outside of the Carver library branch polling location, but there weren't many voters to solicit potential donations for the Carment Kiara's Youth Organization, which benefits from the shirt sales.

According to a worker for the Julie Oliver campaign, the site had a 15-20 minute wait at the start of voting Tuesday, but voters have walked right into the East Austin library branch with no wait since the first hour of voting.

8:20 a.m.: Petitioner seeks signatures for local election reforms

Ernest Smith collects signatures for Austinites for Progressive Reform outside of the Millennium Youth Complex on Election Day. (Joe Lanane/Austonia)

There was no line to vote at Millennium Youth Complex in East Austin, with campaign volunteers outnumbering voters at this time. There was a short line right when polls opened, said Ernest Smith, a volunteer for Austinites for Progressive Reform. Smith was seeking signatures for a petition that could force several election reform initiatives on the local ballot in May 2021.

The reforms include moving the mayoral election to align with presidential election years. Austin Mayor Steve Adler was elected in 2014 in the first local race to be held in November instead of May when most local elections occur in Texas. He was reelected in 2018 during another off-presidential election.

The petition also seeks a ballot question to reform campaign finance rules and make Austin a ranked-choice voting city, the same way Maine will cast ballots Tuesday. Additionally, the reform group seeks to realign Austin's political structure to a mayor-council form of government.

Smith had less than a handful of signatures so far but anticipated more foot traffic during the lunch rush.

8 a.m.: Walk-up COVID-19 testing site is also a polling location on Election Day

Qualifying voters can vote curbside as part of a new Travis County program. (Joe Lanane/Austonia)

Givens Park, a walk-up COVID-19 testing site during the pandemic, doubles Tuesday as an Election Day polling site. A poll watcher for a civil rights group said there was a 10- to 15-minute wait when polls opened at 7 a.m. but there has been no line since.

Every polling site, including the Givens Recreation Center, offers curbside voting as part of an initiative from Travis County. That means poll workers come to your car to help qualifying voters—mostly seniors and voters with special needs—cast a ballot.

The challenge for all of us this Thanksgiving is letting go of what we've lost in this tough year and treasure what we still have.

We at Austonia are thankful for you. Since we launched our site in April, we've done our best to connect you to Austin, with stories ranging from the important to the delightfully superficial. Your response has been strong and we are grateful.

At this time of thanks, we have a variety of stories for you. Laura Figi writes about "a greener holiday," food trends, and Friday shopping. Emma Freer writes about a nearby annual Native American heritage celebration. And Roberto Ontiveros brings us a thoughtful piece that looks at the human toll of Austin's gentrification—the often painful flip side to having shiny new bars, restaurants, and apartments—in this case it's displacement of the Black community on East 11th Street. Finally, we ask you how you're celebrating the holiday this year.

Our best to you and your loved ones!

—The Austonia Team

You can now buy earrings designed by UT students at Kendra Scott

Small businesses have struggled through a long and arduous year, working to keep their livelihood afloat in a sea of uncertainty. This holiday season poses the opportunity to not only give gifts to your favorite people but also give back to your favorite local artists, Austin icons and small businesses.

Keep Reading Show less

Aztec dancers perform as part of the virtual grand finale of the Sacred Springs Power on Nov. 21.

Normally, the Sacred Springs Powwow draws a crowd of thousands to San Marcos, where it is hosted each year by the Indigenous Cultures Institute.

But this year's event, like so many others, occurred online. Sixty Native American dancers competed via streamed performances on Saturday, and vendors, singers and storytellers submitted videos for the audience to view at their leisure.

Keep Reading Show less
(Isabella Lopes/Austonia)
Austin's East 11th Street, with its brunch crowds and boutiques, is a slick and shining example of the gentrification that has taken over what was once designated by the city as the old "negro district."
Keep Reading Show less
(Marco Verch/CC)

The holiday season is the most wonderful time of year; Christmas trees, Thanksgiving feasts, good will toward men and holiday movies never cease to warm up the coldest season. However, no matter how wonderful it is, it's also a very wasteful time of year. Tinsel, paper snowflakes, single-use wrapping paper, excess food, Amazon boxes and cranking up the heat have an impact on the planet.

Keep Reading Show less
Create your own user feedback survey