(Bob Daemmrich)

Election night ended two days ago but the presidential race is still dragging on, and some Austinites are starting to get antsy.


With hundreds of thousands of votes yet to be counted in five key battleground states—Alaska, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina and Pennsylvania—this election is a nail-biter.

Nervous feelings are being shared among many on social media; the waiting game is testing people's patience.


Andrei Matei, who has been living in Austin for more than 20 years now, said he is shocked by the closeness of the presidential race.

"I'm very surprised that the race is as tight as it is at the national level right now," Matei said. "I've never seen our country more divided than it is now."

Austinites are reminding each other to remain calm, knowing the results would not be in anytime soon.

Others, like Austinite Rachel Wilson, are awaiting results calmly, with the attitude that whatever happens, happens.

"The presidential election is close as expected," Wilson said. "Regardless of the outcome we will all be OK. In life, and in politics, no defeat or victory is permanent."

Some locals are choosing to laugh the election nerves away, poking fun at the states the country is waiting on.

Above all else, distraction via hanging with your pup, getting outside or grabbing a bite are popular choices for this election.



Texas has already had a tense election cycle. In the midst of COVID-19, this election was destined to be different than years prior. With six extra days of early voting in Texas, residents did their part by casting their vote.

In the months leading up to the election, Texas appeared to be a swing state with Republicans and Democrats neck and neck, keeping residents on the edge of their seats into election night.

Though Texas' 38 Electoral College votes will go to President Donald Trump, the election is still undecided. According to the Associated Press, Biden currently has 264 electoral votes and Trump at 214 electoral votes of the 270 needed to win office. With at least five states yet to confirm a lead, the race is still not over.

More on waiting:

As the presidential election hangs in the balance, Austin progressive groups look to council runoffs and 2021 legislative session

The challenge for all of us this Thanksgiving is letting go of what we've lost in this tough year and treasure what we still have.

We at Austonia are thankful for you. Since we launched our site in April, we've done our best to connect you to Austin, with stories ranging from the important to the delightfully superficial. Your response has been strong and we are grateful.

At this time of thanks, we have a variety of stories for you. Laura Figi writes about "a greener holiday," food trends, and Friday shopping. Emma Freer writes about a nearby annual Native American heritage celebration. And Roberto Ontiveros brings us a thoughtful piece that looks at the human toll of Austin's gentrification—the often painful flip side to having shiny new bars, restaurants, and apartments—in this case it's displacement of the Black community on East 11th Street. Finally, we ask you how you're celebrating the holiday this year.

Our best to you and your loved ones!

—The Austonia Team

You can now buy earrings designed by UT students at Kendra Scott

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