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(David Stewart / Coldwell Banker Realty)

Most of us will never get to be a cover girl. Such is the cruel way of life. But a new luxury real estate listing at least offers you the chance to own a "cover home."


A house that once glossed the front cover of LIFE Magazine's May 1996 issue is now for sale in Central Austin, priced at a cool $1.3 million.

The design was one of six "dream homes" commissioned by the magazine as part of a series that asked distinguished architects to create middle-class homes.

The headline from the issue: "World-famous architect Michael Graves, who has designed everything from teapots to hotels in Disney World, designs your Dream House at a price the typical American family can afford."


(Life Magazine)


A year later, a savvy Austin resident built this four-bedroom house at 4225 Shoal Creek Blvd. with an added two-car garage.

The architect, Graves, was described in his New York Times obituary in 2015 as "one of the most prominent and prolific American architects of the latter 20th century." President Bill Clinton awarded Graves the National Medal of Arts in 1999, and the American Institute of Architects gave him its gold medal, the highest award for an architect, in 2001.

He was a major influence on today's New Urbanism and New Classicism architectural movements, as well as a champion of what is known as postmodern architecture. The style sought to reflect the "ambiguity of modern experience," and enjoyed a peak in the 80s before people decided they actually preferred things that were easy to understand.

A touch of these unusual schools of thought can be seen in the home's scattering of tiny square windows and use of pillars. Also, the front door opens immediately into a round room with a peculiar water fountain. The listing describes the sound it makes as "calming."


(David Stewart / Coldwell Banker Realty)

Further in, the living room features polished concrete floors, soaring 20 foot ceilings, and an upstairs balcony. Also upstairs, there is an interior skylight looking down into the round room with the magical fountain.

A built-in office makes it perfect for the work-from-home lifestyle. Coworkers will be jealous of your Zoom background that is literally a work of art.

The home's owner, Diana Nye said in a statement that the home is a "sanctuary."

"The warmth and inviting spaces of the house have enriched my life," Nye wrote. "I have raised three children and entertained many close friends with ease and spacious accommodations. The architecture throughout the house offers serenity for whatever mood I might have and has always been enjoyable."

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