(Charlie L. Harper III)

Austin police officers, experts and local leaders will speak with City Council members on Thursday about how to institute sweeping changes to policies at the Austin Police Department in response to public outcry about racism and violence that led to weeks of protest in May and June.

The meeting is livestreaming on ATXN1.


"The objective is to bring to the forefront an open and public conversation about the challenges we will face implementing these big structural changes," said Austin City Council Member Jimmy Flannigan, chairman of the council's Public Safety Committee, which is hosting the discussion on Thursday.

Neither Police Chief Brian Manley nor City Manager Spencer Cronk will be at the workshop, Flannigan said.

Public comment will not be allowed—invited participants only—but the public may watch the proceedings.

The meeting is billed as "a conversation between front line officers and community experts to discuss General Orders and Tactics."

The invited speakers are:
  • Sergeant Mike Crumrine, a founding member and current president of the Lesbian and Gay Peace Officers Association
  • Officer Anna Jackson, an officer at the APD North substation
  • Corporal Marcos Johnson
  • Officer Thomas Villareal, vice president of the Austin Police Association

Last month, in the wake of clashes between police and anti-brutality demonstrators, and after the testimony of hundreds of people calling for change at the police department, the City Council unanimously passed a series of resolutions calling for an overhaul of the APD's budget, practices and leadership.

Austin Police Chief Brian Manley, whose job was on the line after several council members and hundreds of residents called for his removal, ultimately hung onto his position. Two weeks ago, Cronk—who has the power to fire Manley—told the members of the council's Public Safety Committee that the chief is "committed" to overhauling practices.

That committee, which is charged with overseeing these changes, will host a series of workshops to work out what changes should be made, and how they should be put into effect, Flannigan said.

Agendas for those meetings will be posted on the City Council website here.

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