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(Laura Figi/Austonia)

Austin's art scene gained a new addition on the corner of East Cesar Chavez and Navasota, where artist Soledad Fernandez-Whitechurch invited the Austin community to come together to honor the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg with a mural this weekend.


Fernandez-Whitechurch provided materials for people and families in nearby neighborhoods to participate in the creation of the mural. Donations for Planned Parenthood were also collected at the project site.

Ginsburg, who was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court, died on Sept. 18 due to pancreatic cancer. Fernandez-Whitechurch told KXAN she wanted to create something that would inspire everybody and honor Ginsburg's legacy.

The mural is located on the side of Agave Print, a partly woman-owned business. Co-owner Lauren Jaben said she was happy to let Fernandez-Whitechurch use the side of the building.

"We're a 50% woman-owned business and Sole's business is women-run, so it just seemed like a natural subject for the wall," Jaben said. "We're happy to have it here to inspire everybody, especially the ladies."

More on murals:

'If HE can’t breathe, then WE can’t breathe': East Austin mural in tribute to police brutality victims complete

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