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selfie of Federico Portalupi with his art in the background
(Courtesy of Federico Portalupi)

Since the beginning of the pandemic, Austinite Federico Portalupi has gone viral on TikTok for his art work.

When Federico Portalupi started posting to TikTok in May, he never imagined he would go viral. But his artwork—composed of acrylics, powders, glass, inks and other materials—has since been viewed and liked by millions on the app.


It took one particular video for Portalupi's art to really take off on the video sharing platform. A time lapse of him working on an ocean shore art piece has since been viewed over 2 million times.

View video here.www.tiktok.com

Portalupi, 36, didn't always know he was an artist. He moved with his family to Florida from Argentina in 2004 and often walked into an art gallery next door to his family's gelato shop. Eventually, a local artist who taught classes at the gallery told him, "Dude, I see you every single week. You obviously like art. Buy a damn canvas."

These were words he would never forget.

Portalupi bought paints and a canvas shortly after and started painting for the first time—but not for long. He was poised for a business career and stopped painting for about 10 years, during which time he ended up in Austin working in a sales position.

In 2018, he decided to start painting again. He found a passion for resin art. A lot of his pieces showcase oceans, galaxies or abstract art with bold colors.

As part of this "turnaround" process, Portalupi also made his social media debuts—previously not having any social media accounts—on Instagram and Facebook. While he showcased his work in art shows, it was TikTok that launched his business to new, unexpected heights earlier this year.

"I have two passions in life—deep sea fishing and painting. And to be able to think about the possibility of one of those things being my livelihood, while I share what I do and getting the response that I'm currently getting from people without marketing myself, putting myself out there on just one app, it's overwhelming," Portalupi said.

After only four months on the platform, Portalupi has accumulated 1.7 million likes and almost 180,000 followers. He attributes 90% of his art sales to TikTok now. His customers come from all over the globe, including the U.K., Australia and New Zealand.

TikTok has grown increasingly popular since the pandemic began, in part because of the platform's community of users. Portalupi said the TikTok world has become like a family to him. There's a lot of support and interaction with users on the app; Portalupi has actually met and become friends with some of his followers.

After posting a heart design he created, inspired by his friend, he began receiving requests for similar designs from people who shared their own heartfelt stories, including one about suicide.

It's a level of trust Portalupi doesn't take lightly. Next month, he will be working on a piece made from the ashes of a client's family member.

Because of Portalupi's growing platform on TikTok, he soon needed to source more materials. The search that led him to meet a fellow fluid artist, Victorian Wynn, who runs Wynn Modern Art out of Utah. Their working relationship has since blossomed into a friendship, another perk of his newfound TikTok fame.

Portalupi is now a brand ambassador for Wynn Modern Art, meaning he mentions when he uses Wynn Modern Art products in his videos and is sent products to try.

The two have found a safe space with each other to talk about their art and encourage one another. They understand each other's "flow state," where nothing else matters but painting.

"At this point, I'm sending product because I like [him] as a human. We're way beyond brand ambassador," Wynn said. "Both he and I, we have a lot of trust and mutual respect for one another."

Meeting in the shadow of a pandemic and living in different states, the two have never met face to face. But they perform business meetings over Zoom and check up on each other over the phone.

Federico Portalupi meets with Victoria Wynn over video.(Courtesy of Victoria Wynn)

Portalupi hopes to build on his career as an artist, one that he believes can grow even more thanks to TikTok and its community of users.

"I feel like I've identified an opportunity, one that I'm willing to take a risk on and go after," he said.


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‘Like speed dating of cats’ at Purr-fecto Cat Lounge
Purr-fecto Cat Lounge

Lina Martinez with her newly adopted cat, Emmanuel, who she renamed Sullivan.

Timmy and Tommy are ready to play.

As the 2-month-old white-and-tabby brothers swat feather wands, chase toys and generally hold court inside Purr-fecto Cat Lounge, a half-dozen potential adoptive parents look on lovingly, trying to get their attention.

“This is kind of like the speed dating of cats,” said Lupita Foster, owner of Purr-fecto Cat Lounge. “I intentionally didn’t put in any tables. That’s why we call it a lounge instead of a cat café because we have these lounge areas where you can sit and relax and cuddle.”

Foster, who has owned a cleaning company, Enviromaids, for 18 years, was inspired to open Purr-fecto Cat Lounge after adopting her own cat, Romeo, from a local shelter.

“When you want to adopt a cat, you have to spend a lot of time with them to get their personality,” Foster said. “I wanted to do something to help the community and something that makes me feel good, that warms my heart. A business with a purpose. This was a perfect idea.”

Actually, a purr-fect idea.

Inspired in part by a cat lounge she visited in Los Angeles, Foster began laying the groundwork for the business in late 2021 and officially opened the doors of Purr-fecto Cat Lounge, located at 2300 S. Lamar Blvd., in July 2022. Since then, she’s worked with rescue organizations such as Fuzzy Texan Animal Rescue and Sunshine Fund Cat Rescue to facilitate nearly 100 cat adoptions.

At any given time, there are 10-15 cats living in the space, which features an ideal blend of calm, cool corners and adorably Instagrammable backdrops with phrases such as “I want to spend all my 9 lives with you.”

Lina Martinez, 32, learned about Purr-fecto Cat Lounge from a friend’s Instagram post and made an appointment to visit two days later.

“My first impression was, ‘AWW!’” Martinez said. “The kittens were to die for. I felt happy and at peace – just what I needed.”

Visitors to the cat lounge pay $15 for a 30-minute CATXperience session or $30 for a 70-minute session that is spent getting to know the personalities of each cat. Foster said the first thing she typically sees from visitors to the lounge is a smile.

“Everybody that enters the door is smiling,” she said. “And we’ve seen people who have cried because they can’t have kids and they decide to go and adopt a cat instead.”

Foster said she loves bringing in cats who might not have a chance to be adopted at traditional shelters. She told the story of one cat named Izzy, who was partially blind, who was adopted by a family that had a deaf cat at home.

“Izzy was not going to get adopted anywhere else, but she’s extremely beautiful,” she said. “If she was in a cage in a rescue and you tell people she’s blind, she was probably going to be overlooked. But visiting our space, she doesn’t seem like she’s blind. She knows her way around. She moves around perfectly.”

Although Martinez, who had been casually looking for a pet to adopt since moving to Austin nearly four years ago, was interested in a cat named Ruby that she had seen on Purr-fecto’s social media, at the lounge she instead found herself drawn to 5-month-old mixed breed Tuxedo cat.

“I thought he was a star,” she said. “He worked the room and introduced himself to everyone. When I laid down to pet Ruby, he ran from the other side of the room and cuddled with me. It was game over. He got me.”

And she, of course, got him, complete with a commemorative photo that read “My Furrever Family” the day she took him home. Although his original name was Emmanuel, she renamed him Sullivan after her favorite DJ.

“Purr-fecto is special because of the amount of effort and love they put into taking care of the cats,” Martinez said, “and finding them good homes and making possible adopters feel at home.”

Foster, who spent a recent Thursday hosting a group of teenagers in foster care at the lounge, several of whom expressed interest in working there, said the best part about her new endeavor is that her heart is always full.

“I just feel complete,” she said. “I always felt as an entrepreneur that I was missing something. I knew I accomplished a lot, but in my heart I was missing a little connection with the community. Now I’m creating connections between humans and pets and that’s amazing. I’m creating family bonds. It’s just about love, you know. And we need that.”

Austin's 7 Best Indian Restaurants

We all have those cravings for an amazing butter chicken or some authentic dosas with coconut chutney, but when I was thinking about where I wanted to go to satisfy my taste buds I realized that my list of great Indian food around Austin was surprisingly short. After doing some research and asking around, here is your list of the best Indian restaurants around town.

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