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A few days after TikTok said it would hire hundreds in Austin, the company has since said it is "re-evaluating" those jobs and is "forced to hold on that hiring until we have further clarity" on a White House order threatening to ban the video-sharing app in the U.S.


There are still 46 job openings in Austin for the video-sharing platform, but the company released a statement to several news organizations this week saying that President Trump's Executive Order threatening to ban TikTok puts those, as well as 10,000 more new jobs across the U.S., "in jeopardy."

"TikTok has committed to creating 10,000 great paying jobs across the US – including more than 2,000 here in Texas – but the Executive Order puts those new jobs in jeopardy," a TikTok spokesperson said in a statement, according to KXAN. "While we're forced to hold on that hiring until we have further clarity from the Administration, we're working hard to ensure that we can offer employment for years to come as we build an enduring platform for our users, creators, partners, and the broader community in the US."

TikTok has 45 days from the Aug. 6 Executive Order's signing to sell to another company before being banned, under the order. The executive order claims TikTok captures user data and is used by the Chinese government.

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