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(Isabella Lopes/Austonia file photo)

Austin is due to see unusually warm weather despite Punxsutawney Phil, the nation's most famous groundhog, missing his shadow and predicting six more weeks of winter this year.


In Central Texas, February is usually one of the coolest months of the year with the average high not reaching over 65 degrees. On Wednesday, however, the temperature in Austin will reach the mid-70s, well over the monthly norm.

Windy conditions on Thursday could bring gusts up to 20-30 mph.

On Thursday, Austinites will experience the warmest weather seen in quite some time with temperatures soaring to 82 degrees throughout the day and partly cloudy skies.

After the extreme temperatures for this time of year, a cold front is expected to roll in on Thursday night bringing the temperatures back down to the season's average range with a high of 65 and a low of 44 degrees on Friday.

Saturday will have partly-cloudy skies and slightly warmer weather with temperatures reaching 70 but will drop to 41 as another cold front sweeps through the region, bringing Sunday's low down to 39 and the high to 65 degrees.

Punxsutawney Phil hasn't always had the best track record when it comes to accurately predicting winter weather, especially in Austin, where temperatures are warmer for most of the year.

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