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(Taylor Prinsen Photography)

As fans gear up for another season of The Bachelorette - with Austin Chef Page Pressley as a contestant - sources revealed to E News and People Magazine that Bachelorette Clare Crawley found love early on in the show's filming, passing her spot to a new Bachelorette before the end of the season.


In early July, Pressley was revealed as one of the contestants on the unique season, in which contestants will not travel but stay on a resort to continue the show during the global coronavirus pandemic. In the delay of the show in March due to the pandemic, a source tells People, the Bachelorette-to-be Crawley was in contact with one of her suitors. She fell in love, People reported, and wanted off the show.

Could the winning suitor be our local Austin chef? Could be, but we won't know until the show airs this fall.

What we do know is this: Replacing her is Bachelor-in-Paradise alum Tayshia Adams, a contestant in Colton Underwood's season.

On Sunday, Bachelorette fans were buzzing about what E News reports as Crawley appearing to "like" and quickly "unlike" a fan's post about Adams becoming the Bachelorette on Twitter. During the filming of the show, phones are taken away, verifying to many that Crawley is not filming anymore.

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(NK Maribor/Twitter)

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