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Along with the Central Austin pressure zones, the South, North and Northwest A zones (pictured in green above), are no longer under a boil-water notice as of mid-day Monday.

The remaining five zones are undergoing state-mandated sampling, with results due tomorrow. Austin Water Director Greg Meszaros said he is hopeful that the notice will be lifted for those areas where it remains in effect during a press conference on Wednesday.


Testing of water began Sunday after the notice went into effect by Austin Water last week and is still in effect for other parts of Austin (in yellow above). The utility issued a boil water notice after a power outage at the Ullrich Water Plant and low pressure system wide occurred amid a historic winter storm event that swept over Texas. Over a hundred public water mains burst or broke, as well as "tens of thousands" of similar events on private property, such as residences and businesses, Meszaros said. "The biggest remaining task we have ... is repairing water main breaks," he added.

According to Austin Water, once the notice is lifted, residents should:

  • Run all cold water faucets for one minute.
  • Flush automatic ice makers, make three batches of ice and discard.
  • Run water softeners through a regeneration cycle.
For others still affected by the boil-water notice and unable to purchase water, drinking water can be found here.

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