(Laura Figi/Austonia)

Hiram Garcia, on the right with a white mask, talks to a protester after he is shoved to the ground for live streaming.

After a Kentucky grand jury ruled not to charge two of the three police officers involved in the killing of Breonna Taylor, protesters across the country took to the streets, including at the Texas Capitol and Austin City Hall to stand against the decision.


The protest, titled "Justice for Breonna Taylor—Solidarity with Louisville," started at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The protest was not organized by a specific group or person, though groups like the Mike Ramos Brigade, a local anti-police organization with ties to antifa, and Back the Blue, a pro-police organization, were present.

Protester Ellie A., who was not affiliated with any group, said she was there to protest for what matters.

"Black lives matter," Ellie said. "That is not apparent from the things that happen in our world."

Shortly after the protest began, a group of protesters attacked Hiram Garcia, an independent streamer who often films protests and "history in the making," by shoving Garcia and his camera to the floor. Some protesters yelled and suggested he leave the protest.

Garcia, who streams on Facebook Live, said he has been attending protests since May 30 and said people are quick to recognize him.

"They just don't want me here, that's it," Garcia said. "The problem is I'm an unbiased host."

Protest attendee, who goes by the name Shera, has been protesting for racial justice since May and said she has faced dangerous situations, such as being pepper sprayed. Shera said Garcia was generally accepted at first, but while he elects to remain neutral, he has gained a right-wing audience he has yet to denounce.

"(Garcia has) talked to the cops in a way that a lot of the protesters don't like, or just giving them airtime (on the livestream) and loving them—pretty much speaking propaganda," Shera said. "It's okay if they don't want him here but getting physical like that … is just completely uncalled for."

About 45 minutes into the protest, protesters took to West Cesar Chavez Street and blocked traffic. Shortly after, they were followed by multiple police cars, who ordered them to clear out the roads under threat of arrest.

Groups of protesters continued to march through the streets, as several people were arrested. One protester was arrested on 3rd Street and San Jacinto, seen being patted down with zip-tied wrists.

Several protesters were arrested for class B and C misdemeanors, according to the Austin Police Department.

Shera said the protests were meant to show solidarity with Louisville and Breonna Taylor, and the ruling was disappointing.

"We are not done," Shera said. "We are still waiting for a lot of justice to be served for the police that have hurt all of the protesters that are out here."


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