(Buffalo Billiards/Facebook)

After 21 years in downtown, Buffalo Billiards will join the growing list of memorable Austin businesses to close due to the coronavirus pandemic.


Buffalo Billiards sits across from the Driskill Hotel at 201 E. 6th St. The bar announced their temporary closure on its website in March, stating it would re-open "as soon as it's safe to do so." The bar has since announced that it is closing permanently due to rising operating costs and COVID-19 restrictions.

(Buffalo Billiards Facebook)

General manager Tina Bodell said the decision to close was a difficult one but they wish other businesses well during this trying time.

"We are proud to have been a source of entertainment for not only the Austin community, but also the many tourists and convention attendees that passed through downtown," Bodell wrote in an email to Austonia.

According to the website, Buffalo Billiards was built in 1861 and originally called the "Missouri House." The building was Austin's first boarding house and was rumored to have been a brothel. The bar was renamed Buffalo Billiards to preserve the good cowboy fun that was to be had there.

Pinball groups would meet at Buffalo Billiards since it was lined with old and new pinball machines. Bodell said they will miss the events they used to host and watching countless UT games at the bar.

"Thank you, Austin, for your support over the past 21 years," Bodell said.


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