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(Capital Metro)

The Broadmoor station will extend the red line half a mile north of the Domain and increase its annual ridership to 240,000 people.

North Austin will soon be home to a new $24 million MetroRail station, located just north of the Domain, where it will serve as a mobility hub and central feature of a forthcoming 66-acre, $2 billion mixed-use redevelopment of the Broadmoor campus, which includes IBM.


The Capital Metro board of directors approved a public-private partnership with Philadelphia-based developer Brandywine Realty Trust on Monday, which will jointly fund the new station.

Capital Metro will pay $12 million of the cost, with Brandywine responsible for the remainder.

Groundbreaking of the station is scheduled for September, and it will open in summer 2022. As proposed, the station will grow the number of annual boardings on the red line—which currently runs from the Domain to downtown Austin—to 240,000, second only to Capital Metro's downtown station.


The Broadmoor redevelopment is nestled between the Domain and the Charles Schwab campus in North Austin. The new Broadmoor station will extend the red line. (Brandywine Realty Trust)


"This really shows the strong support for transit-oriented development in Austin," Capital Metro Executive Vice President of Planning and Development Sharmila Mukherjee told board members.

The station will be built immediately north of IBM Road and directly adjacent to the Broadmoor campus, which will be redeveloped as a high-density, mixed-use project that includes retail, office, resident, hotel and green spaces. The full build-out is expected to take until 2036 to complete.


The Broadmoor redevelopment project proposes a high-density, mixed-use campus, serviced by the forthcoming red line station, shown on the bottom right.(Brandywine Realty Trust)


"Brandywine is creating a true, urban, prototypical live-work-play environment in Broadmoor with fantastic connectivity and vibrancy, a tremendous draw for Austin's depe and growing talent pool," JLL Senior Vice President Barry Haydon said in a press release issued last year.

Eric Stratton, who represents Williamson County on the board, said his constituents have been waiting for such a hub.

"Having a gateway on the red line and making transportation to and from the burgeoning second downtown at the Domain and Broadmoor a reality is something we're really excited about in my neck of the woods," he said.

This article has been updated to clarify the red line course.

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