Your daily dose of Austin
Smartphone image
×
Make your inbox more Austin.
Local news and fun, every day 6am.
city council screenshot
(Austin City Council)

Austin Mayor Pro Tem Delia Garza on Thursday threatened to vote "no" on the city's annual budget next month if she doesn't see "significant" funds moved out of the Austin Police Department, as directed by the City Council last week.


"We all made some very clear statements about wanting change, and without that, I'm curious to know: Are we going to have six votes to pass the budget?" Garza said during a meeting of the Council Committee on Public Safety. "Unless there is a significant ... moving [of] funds, I can't see myself voting 'yes' on a budget."

Last week, in the wake of clashes between police and anti-brutality demonstrators, and after the testimony of hundreds of people calling for change at the police department, the City Council unanimously passed a series of resolutions calling for an overhaul of the APD's budget, practices and leadership.

Garza's remarks came in response to a suggestion by Deputy Chief Financial Officer Ed Van Eenoo that, while some parts of the initial budget proposal will reflect the council's wishes when it is presented on July 13, in order to create the sort of seismic changes the council and community are requesting, much more work needs to be done.

"We need to define what public safety needs to be for our community and then build a budget based on what those expectations are," Van Eenoo told the committee.

Advocates and some council members have called for at least $100 million to be removed from the police department's $440 million annual budget.

The new budget proposal will include cutting around 100 officer positions, including about 60 that would be anticipated in next year's budget, amounting to a savings of at least $6 million.

Van Eenoo said each new police officer position costs the city about $100,000 in training, salary, equipment and related expenses.

The city's fiscal year begins in October. Last year, the council approved a $4.2 billion budget, including $1.1 in general funds.

Popular

UT Austin makes list of nation's Top 25 Party Schools
austonia

College ratings site Niche.com has released its 2023 Top Party School rankings.

One Texas college made the list: the University of Texas at Austin.

Longhorns know how to party with the best, apparently. But anyone who's spent time on the Forty Acres may wonder why the ranking was so low.

Here's the complete list:

  1. Univ. of California - Santa Barbara
  2. Tulane University
  3. Florida State University
  4. The University of Alabama
  5. Howard University
  6. University of Wisconsin
  7. University of Georgia
  8. Syracuse University
  9. University of Southern California ✌️
  10. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
  11. West Virgina University
  12. Penn State
  13. University of Mississippi
  14. Ohio University
  15. Miami University
  16. Indiana University - Bloomington
  17. University of Iowa
  18. San Diego State University
  19. Florida A&M University
  20. Michigan State University
  21. University of Texas - Austin
  22. The Ohio State University
  23. University of Virginia
  24. Rutgers University - New Brunswick
  25. University of Colorado Boulder
Fall camping: Camp Fimfo Waco offers one-of-a-kind experiences in the heart of Texas
Camp Fimfo Waco

Camp Fimfo Waco, a brand new camping resort, is kicking off football and fall camping season in style! With top-notch amenities, premium accommodations, and 10 weekends of fall fun, there’s no better place to have a fall camping getaway, especially if you’re a Baylor football fan!

Keep ReadingShow less