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Daniel Pe
(F. Clinton Broden/Broden & Mickelsen)

Note: Updated with linked information about Perry's Tweets, comments from Foster's mother.

The man who killed Garrett Foster at a Black Lives Matter protest in downtown Austin last weekend revealed his identity and claims he fired his gun in self defense, according to a statement shared with Austonia by his attorney on Friday.


Daniel Perry, an active duty sergeant with the U.S. Army, was driving for a ride-hailing company when he encountered protesters at the corner of Fourth Street and Congress Avenue, according to the statement from Clint Broden of the Dallas firm Broden & Mickelsen.

Perry claims several people started beating on his car and that Foster, who was carrying an assault rifle, began to raise the gun toward him, prompting Perry to shoot the person "to protect his own life," per the release. Perry said in the statement he drove away and called the police.

Foster's mother, Sheila Foster, told the Austin American-Statesman that Perry went to the rally not by mistake, but "to hurt people."

In the report, she pointed to statements on Perry's now-defunct Twitter account as evidence that he disagreed with the BLM protesters.

But Broden told the Statesman the tweets show a man "agreeing with President Trump that there's a problem with violent protests" but who is "fully in favor of peaceful protests."

The Statesman reported that some 15 years ago, Perry pleaded no-contest and received probation for a 2005 misdemeanor assault against a family member in Addison, north of Dallas. He has no other arrests on his record, and Foster has no arrests, the report said.

After the shooting

After Perry shot Foster, another member of the crowd shot at Perry's vehicle, police have said.

Perry and the member of the crowd who discharged a handgun were questioned and released, according to APD. Both had concealed handgun licenses.

Perry's attorney claims witnesses who attended the protest told police that Foster raised his rifle "in a direct threat to Sgt. Perry's life." In a press release issued on Monday, APD said witnesses described several different versions of the incident.

The attorney did not specify which ride-hailing company employed Perry. Both Uber and Lyft prohibit drivers from carrying firearms while using the app, with some exceptions. It is unclear if those policies apply to active military personnel.

A spokesperson for Lyft said there are no records indicating Perry ever drove for the company. Austonia has reached out to Uber for comment.

Both Lyft and Uber prohibit drivers from carrying firearms while using the app, with some exceptions. It is unclear if those policies apply to active military personnel.In the absence of an arrest, charges or public naming of the shooter, speculation swirled in the six days since Foster's death.

APD released a statement on Thursday, before Perry was identified, attempting to quell rumors about his identity and why police had not identified or charged him.

"There are rumors circulating about the identity of those involved," it read. "What we can definitely say is that no one involved in this case has any connection to law enforcement agencies, including APD."

Asked by Austonia if that included familial connections to any APD employees or officers, a spokesperson for the department confirmed that "the people involved in the case have no nexus to APD in any way."




Additional reporting by Karen Brooks Harper.


Popular

With deposition and trial looming, Elon Musk has offered $44B for Twitter, again
Shutterstock

Elon Musk has proposed once again to buy Twitter for $54.20 a share.

The news that Musk is offering to carry on with the $44 billion buyout was first reported by Bloomberg. Now, a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission shows Musk made the proposal in a letter to the tech giant on Monday.

The New York Stock Exchange temporarily halted trading in Twitter stock twice Tuesday, first because of a big price move and the second time for a news event, presumably the announcement of Musk's renewed offer.

While the per share offer price on this latest proposal remains the same as the original offer, it’s unclear if Musk has made other term changes or if Twitter would reject it. According to other reports, a deal could be reached this week.

The stock closed at $52.00/share Tuesday, indicating market uncertainty around the $54.20 offer.

After Musk informed Twitter of plans to terminate the original agreement in July, Twitter sued. A trial has been expected in Delaware Chancery Court on Oct. 17.

With the proposition of a buyout on the table again, it revives the question of whether Musk might move Twitter from San Francisco to Central Texas.

He’s done so with some of his other companies. Tesla’s headquarters in southeast Travis County had its grand opening earlier this year and tunneling business The Boring Company moved to Pflugerville. At least two other Musk companies, SpaceX and Neuralink, have a Central Texas presence without being headquartered here.

Technology journalist Nilay Patel this afternoon voiced concerns that owning Twitter and Tesla together could be problematic for Musk, as his Tesla manufacturing facilities in Germany and China are both in countries that have disputes with Twitter over content moderation and censorship.

Telsa shares fell after the Twitter news became public, before rallying to close up, at $249.44.

Austin rents nearly double in a year and are now in the top 5 nationwide
Dwellsy

While searching for a place to live, Austin renters will face monthly rates of nearly $3,000, a recent guide from rental marketplace Dwellsy shows.

The median rent in August this year was $2,930, a more than 86% increase since August 2021. That’s $820 more than the nationwide median asking rent in August and puts Austin just below the Bay Area, Boston and New York for large cities with the most expensive asking rent.

“Within this group, Austin, TX stands out for the highest increases in asking rent, which has nearly doubled since this time last year,” the study notes.

Outside of those large cities, however, others are seeing even higher rent spikes. Metro areas that ranked above Austin in one-year increases include those like Kansas City, MO with a 112% change in rent since last August and Tucson, AZ with a 124% change.

The data reflects large apartment communities, single-family homes and 2-6 unit buildings.