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New COVID-19 treatments headed to Texas, including drug used to treat President Trump
(Jurnej Furman/CC)

With COVID-19 cases on the rise all over Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott delivered some good news: Texas will receive shipments of new drugs to combat COVID-19, including the therapeutic drug that helped recover President Trump from the virus.


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized the immediate use of Eli Lilly & Co.'s antibody drug bamlanivimab. The drug is the first medical treatment approved for COVID-19 and has been shown to improve related symptoms; it is meant for patients at high risk, heading toward severe COVID-19 symptoms and elderly patients.

Abbott said in a press release that this would be the "first day of what will be many announcements in the coming weeks about the availability of medicines and vaccines" to combat COVID-19.

About 80,000 doses will be shipped immediately all over the country, including Texas, with a million doses by the end of the year. The drug comes at no cost to the states.

Abbott told KTRK-TV that Texas will also receive a shipment of Regeneron, the same drug that was given to Trump while he battled the virus, about a week after Lilly's drug starts distribution.

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. also requested FDA emergency use of their antibody drug and is awaiting approval.

The federal government has agreed to buy doses in the hundreds of thousands of both drugs and allocate the supplies to each state, determining the amount based on the COVID-19 caseload per state, according to Abbott.

This news comes shortly after Pfizer's announcement that its 90% effective vaccine will be available as quickly as later this month.

Texas recently became the state with the most cases of the virus, surpassing a million cases on Tuesday.


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