Sign up for the Austonia daily newsletter
×
becomeMemberIcon

become a member

The Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport is now the busiest in the world, The Wall Street Journal reports (paywall):


"In May, DFW had 12,109 departing passenger flights, edging out Chengdu, China, by 86 flights for the title of busiest in the world, according to Cirium, a London-based travel data and analytics firm. In June, DFW widened its lead over Chengdu, Cirium says."

DFW had already become the nation's busiest airport in May.

Before the pandemic, DFW usually ranked behind several U.S. airports, according to the WSJ:

"DFW typically ranks behind Atlanta, Chicago O'Hare and Los Angeles in takeoffs and landings. But due to the instant transformation of the airline business, DFW finds itself at least temporarily on top, with long-lasting implications for travelers."

Busy, of course, is a relative term right now. "American will hit 667 flights a day later this month," the paper reports. "Last summer it flew more than 900 a day, and with larger airplanes."

Popular

A mixed-use development known as Mirador will be located off the 130 Toll and Highway 71. (Hines)

A $500 million mixed-use development spanning 1,400 acres is coming to Southeast Austin, near Tesla’s headquarters at Giga Texas.

Keep Reading Show less

Former UT tennis coach Michael Center told Sports Illustrated he thinks others were involved in the Varsity Blues scandal at UT.

Editor's note: This story summarizes Sports Illustrated's story detailing Michael Center's involvement in the Varsity Blues college admissions scandal, based on interviews with SI's Jon Wertheim. Additionally, Austonia received comments from Michael Center, included in this story.

Confined to his couch, former Longhorns tennis coach Michael Center praised his players via FaceTime after the program he built produced the Longhorns’ first national championship in 2019—a bittersweet moment as Center faced federal charges as part of the Varsity Blues college admissions scandal.

Keep Reading Show less