(Bob Daemmrich)

More than 43% of registered Travis County residents voted early in person or had their mail-in ballots received between Oct. 13 and Thursday, with eight more days to go before the early voting period ends on Oct. 30.


Texas Gov. Greg Abbott extended the early voting period by six days in July, due to the pandemic.

A record-breaking 97% of eligible Travis County residents are registered to vote this election, according to the Travis County Tax Assessor-Collector and Voter Registrar.

So far, the highest turnout this early voting period was last Friday, when nearly 41,265 people turned out to vote in person.

The bulk—nearly 86%—of early votes cast this election have been in-person. The remainder are mostly mail-in ballots, which Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir said are mostly requested by residents 65 years of age and older.

A very small number of early votes—434, or less than 1%—have come through limited ballots, which are intended for registered voters who have moved recently and are not registered in their new county of residence in time for the election.

As of Thursday evening, 370,970 people had voted early—either in person or by sending in their mail-in ballot—in Travis County. During the first 10 days of early voting in the 2016 presidential election, 297,357 people had voted; in 2012, 177,071 had.

During the 2016 presidential election, 40.8% of registered Travis County voters cast their ballots in the first 10 days of the early voting period and 51% voted early overall, according to the Travis County Clerk's office. In 2012, 27.9% of registered Travis County voters cast their ballots in the first 10 days of the early voting period and just under 38% did overall.

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