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Austin ISD is considering what it calls a "blended learning approach"—or a kind of hybrid schooling model—when classes resume in August, according to a newsletter sent out by the district.


AISD hasn't made a final decision, and hasn't released specifics, but did provide a list of precautions for in-person instruction:

  • health and safety training on COVID-19 for staff
  • screenings for symptoms
  • measures to keep people at least six feet apart
  • facial covering requirements for kids age 6 & older
  • frequent cleanings and disinfecting common areas
  • increased handwashing practices
  • having campuses operate in smaller groups and at lower capacities
  • requiring students and staff to stay home if they or family tests positive

Nearly 300 parents and families joined a Zoom call earlier this week to weigh in on how the district should proceed. AISD closed all schools in March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

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