(Pu Ying Huang/The Texas Tribune)

STAAR decorations adorn the hallways of Wharton Elementary School in 2018.

By Aliyya Swaby, The Texas Tribune

Texas students will still have to take the STAAR test next year, but fifth and eighth grade students will be able to move on to the next grade even if they fail, Gov. Greg Abbott announced Monday.


State education officials announced earlier this summer that third through 12th grade students would take the state standardized exams, or STAAR, this upcoming academic year. Normally, fifth and eighth graders must pass the STAAR in order to move on to the next grade or else they must re-take it later that year or over the summer. But Abbott said that next spring, the fifth and eighth grade math and reading exams would only be administered one time, in May.

He also said schools and districts would continue to receive an A-F rating based on students' test scores, "albeit with certain adjustments due to COVID-19." The statement did not elaborate on those adjustments.

Last spring, after school buildings began closing because of the pandemic, Abbott gave school districts flexibility to decide on fifth and eighth graders' promotions based on students' grades, academic information and teachers' opinions. Student scores on the STAAR also determine whether high school students and graduate and whether schools can remain open. In normal circumstances, high school students must pass five subject-specific standardized tests in order to graduate. Abbott's release did not mention waivers for those students.

Parents, educators and lawmakers from both parties have been urging Abbott to call off testing requirements for the upcoming school year because of how the coronavirus pandemic has interrupted students' usual learning environment.

But Abbott said the test was necessary to provide a high-quality education for students. "By waiving these promotion requirements, we are providing greater flexibility for students and teachers, while at the same time ensuring that Texas students continue to receive a great education — which we will continue to measure with high quality assessments," he said in a statement Monday.

The decision to continue administering the STAAR came days after federal officials said not to expect a waiver from federal testing requirements next spring. Jim Blew, an assistant secretary to Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, told reporters at an event Friday that testing provided many benefits, including showing where students fell behind due to the pandemic.

Last spring, the Trump administration announced it would not enforce federal standardized testing requirements that school year because of the coronavirus.

Originally published in The Texas Tribune, a nonpartisan, nonprofit media organization that informs Texans—and engages with them – about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

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