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Elon Musk is looking to expand another one of his companies to Austin. His brain implant startup Neuralink is hiring four positions in the area, according to its website.

Add brain-implant tech and game development to the list of things billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk is bringing to Austin.

Neuralink, Musk's "Fitbit in your skull" startup, is hiring four positions based in Austin, including three engineering roles, according to the Neuralink website.


Musk founded Neuralink in 2016 with the aim of developing a brain-machine interface system, which entails implanting a small gadget into a person's brain to track neural activity, similar to how activity trackers like Fitbit count steps, heart rate and other physical activities.

In a white paper published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research last year, Musk wrote that such a system "hold[s] promise for the restoration of sensory and motor function and the treatment of neurological disorders, but … [has] not yet been widely adopted."

The bulk of Neuralink's team is based in Fremont, California, where another Musk company—electric carmaker Tesla—has a factory. The Neuralink website currently has 17 job postings in the city, which is near Palo Alto.

But Musk has already signaled his affinity for Texas many times this year.

In July, Tesla announced a $1.1 billion factory in Southeast Travis County that will provide at least 5,000 jobs and produce its Cybertruck and its Model Y SUV. In exchange for meeting certain conditions, including a $15 an hour minimum wage, Tesla will receive significant tax rebates from Travis County and Del Valle ISD.

The company is also planning to hire game developers based in Austin, suggesting that Tesla's presence may go beyond manufacturing. "Our goal is to set the bar for what video games in a car can be; much of this is uncharted territory having never been done before," the job listing reads.

Amber Allen—CEO and founder of the local immersive technology firm Double A Labs, whose clients include Alienware, Verizon and Warner Media—said she isn't surprised that Musk and Tesla are attracted to the area.

"Austin is a great hub for tech, design, and augmented reality," she said.

"Many of the technologies inside a car can be daunting, especially with the new modern look inside," Allen added. "Turning the [transportational] journey into a game would improve the user experience and help them know the true value of what the car can do for them, but in a fun, immersive environment."

Last month, another Musk outfit—SpaceX—also posted a new job listing on its website for a resort development manager based out of its Boca Chica, Texas, launch facility. The employee would lead the creation of a Spaceport resort.

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