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You might've heard of EVs, standing for electric vehicles, but one company is making EVVs, or electric vaccine vehicles.


Austin-based electric vehicle provider Ayro launched a new vaccine transportation service this month that allows vaccines to be stored in the freezing temperatures required while being distributed to optimal sites. The effort is in collaboration with Element Fleet Management, an automotive fleet manager; Club Car, a golf cart and commercial vehicle company; and Gallery, a manufacturer of mobile food, beverage and merchandising carts.

The vehicles, which release zero emissions, are equipped with an ultra-low temperature freezer and refrigeration units that allow the vehicles to transport vaccines to areas that would be otherwise difficult to reach such as gymnasiums and stadiums. Once set up as a vaccine station, the vehicle takes up no more than 100 square feet.

"COVID-19 testing and vaccine distribution has become a serious logistical challenge, and our purpose-built EVs offer a potential solution," AYRO CEO Rod Keller said.

The vehicles are currently touring the nation. Find them at these locations:

  • Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas (March 22-25)
  • San Jose, California (March 29 – 31)
  • Irvine, California (April 1 – 2)
  • Boston, Massachusetts (April 5-8)

While being used for vaccine distribution now, these vehicles can be repurposed for disaster relief, annual flu shot distribution, medical testing, food services and more in the future, according to Ayro's website.

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