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Tesla's proposed deal to bring a new "Gigafactory" to Austin was quickly followed by rumors that the company might move its headquarters here too—and along with it, CEO Elon Musk and his family. But the agreements haven't been signed, and as far as anyone knows, Tulsa is still on the table.


Tesla looks to fast-track approval of an Austin 'Gigafactory' (Video by Ethan Hunt) www.youtube.com


Musk is in a relationship and has a son with musician Grimes. So, where does it make the most sense for Musk to bring his family and company? Austin. Here's why.

1. The live music capital of the world

ACL Concert Stage

(Choose_Freewill via Flickr)

Happy wife, happy life, right? What better place for Grimes to move than Austin, with its musical flare.

She would live among countless other musicians in Austin. Also for her convenience, there are 204 recording studios in the Austin area, with endless opportunity to perform live, including at festivals like Austin City Limits, where she has previously performed.

2. Friendly neighborhoods for raising children

With Grimes giving birth to son X AE A-XII last month, Austin would be a great family-friendly place for him to grow up. It has an array of highly-ranked primary and secondary education options.

Last year, millennials ranked Austin at the top of the list for friendliest, cleanest city in the U.S. in a survey conducted by Langston Co. Austin is known as a progressive city that embraces a "weird" culture—perfect for the child of eccentric parents.

3. Highly educated population

(staff/Austonia)

Between 27 colleges and universities, Austin offers a highly educated labor pool for Tesla, and a great set of potential friends for the family. The need for engineering and technical workers would be easy to find in a city with nearly 45% of residents over age 25 having bachelors degrees.

Also, in-state tuition for X AE A-XII—not that they need the discount.

4. Personality of the city

austin skyline downtown

(SeanPavonePhoto/Adobe)

A source told Austonia that Texas' "entrepreneurial, pioneering personality" matches that of Elon Musk. This couldn't be more true. Tesla could fit right in with the innovative culture of Austin.

Companies like Optimizely, Indeed and Bumble are just a few that have flourished in the city.

5. Live among other celebs

(UT College of Communication via Creative Commons)

There are no shortage of celebrities in California, of course, but Musk and his family would have good company as a few of Austin's local stars. It's a spot for celebs to get a smaller-town feel, but still live in a big city.

Celebrities living in Austin include Matthew McConaughey, Elijah Wood and Jenson Ackles.

Want to read more stories like this one? Start every day with a quick look at what's happening in Austin. Sign up for Austonia.com's free daily morning email.
 


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