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Tesla Cybertruck
(Mike Mareen/Adobe)

Elon Musk's Tesla Cybertruck may find a home in Austin.

Texas is the home of the pickup truck—roughly one in five sold in the U.S. is bought here. But the next model to be made here may be one unlike any seen before.


If Tesla decides to bring its next factory to Austin, the unique-looking Cybertruck would be one of two models produced, and the electric carmaker is pitching it as a natural fit.

"I think you guys will really enjoy it down in Texas," Rohan Patel, Tesla's director of public policy and business development, told Travis County commissioners.

cybertruck interior

(mrlewaynee/Wikimedia via Creative Commons)

Both the Del Valle ISD school board and Travis County Commissioners Court are considering tax breaks for Tesla, which has proposed the $1.1 billion "Gigafactory" for a site in Southeast Austin and plans to hire 5,000 people to work there.

Cybertruck

The vehicle features "a nearly impenetrable exoskeleton" made of stainless steel, "vault-like storage" and an "ability to pull near infinite mass," according to the company's website.

Now available for preorder, production of the Cybertruck is expected to begin in late 2022. The price ranges from $39,900 to $69,900, depending on the motor type, with a self-driving add-on available for $8,000.

When Tesla CEO Elon Musk unveiled the Cybertruck on Nov. 21 at an event in Los Angeles, it prompted much feedback on its design.


But others are enamored with the vehicle.

A Cybertruck recently went on display at the Petersen Automotive Museum in L.A.

The proposed factory would also produce the company's Model Y, a midsize SUV, for East Coast markets, Musk tweeted on March 10.

If approved by DVISD and Travis County commissioners, construction could begin on the factory as soon as this fall.

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1923 Lake Austin mansion demolition request pitting preservationists and some neighbors against owner and city preservation office
Austin Monitor

By Jonathan Lee

The Planning Commission was split Tuesday on whether to help save an eclectic lakefront estate from demolition by zoning it historic amid concerns over tax breaks and the likelihood that a previous owner participated in segregation as a business owner.

The property in question, known as the Delisle House, is located at 2002 Scenic Drive in Tarrytown. The main house, with Spanish and Modern influences, was built in 1923 by Raymond Delisle, an optician. A Gothic Revival accessory apartment was built in 1946. The current owner applied to demolish the structures in order to build a new home.'

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Freaky Floats and other Austin food & drink news
Austin Motel

What's new in Austin food & drink this week:

  • Nau's Enfield Drug closing after losing their lease. Did McGuire Moorman Lambert buy the building, with its vintage soda fountain?
  • Nixta Taqueria Chef Edgar Rico named to Time Magazine's Time 100 Next influencer list, after winning a James Beard Award earlier this year.
  • Question: From what BBQ joint did pescatarian Harry Styles order food this week?
  • Austin Motel is opening the pool and pool bar Wednesday nights in October for Freaky Floats.
  • Vincent's on the Lake closing due to "economic conditions and low water levels [at Lake Travis]."
  • Cenote has closed its Windsor Park location. The East Cesar Chavez location remains open.
  • The Steeping Room on N. Lamar has closed.
  • Local startup It's Skinnyscored new financing for its gluten-free pasta business.
  • P. Terry's opened a new location in Kyle, at 18940 IH-35.