Gov. Greg Abbott modified his executive orders today to retroactively ban local jurisdictions from putting people in jail for violating COVID orders, thus freeing the Dallas salon owner who was sentenced to seven days in jail.

Abbot's statement:


"Throwing Texans in jail who have had their businesses shut down through no fault of their own is nonsensical, and I will not allow it to happen. That is why I am modifying my executive orders to ensure confinement is not a punishment for violating an order. This order is retroactive to April 2nd, supersedes local orders and if correctly applied should free Shelley Luther. It may also ensure that other Texans like Ana Isabel Castro-Garcia and Brenda Stephanie Mata who were arrested in Laredo, should not be subject to confinement. As some county judges advocate for releasing hardened criminals from jail to prevent the spread of COVID-19, it is absurd to have these business owners take their place."

The governor last week issued executive orders that kept cities from enforcing mandatory mask policies.

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(Charlie L. Harper III)

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