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holidays

The Hill Country Galleria is hosting its Independence Day Festival this year after canceling last year. (Hill Country Galleria/Instagram)

It's almost America's birthday and you know what that means—time to celebrate like it's 2019.

With fireworks, corn dog eating contests, cookouts and crawfish boils galore, Austin businesses and restaurants are pulling out all the stops to make up for lost time and get people excited to exercise the freedom to party. Happening all on Sunday, no matter who you spend the holiday with, you're guaranteed to find an event for anyone but here are a few options to get you started.

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(Pexels)

Independence Day is right around the corner, and you might want to stock up on fireworks sooner rather than later, lest you encounter low stock and higher prices.

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Texas has the fourth-most attractions of any other state for road tripping fun. (CGP Grey/Flickr)

Flights may be in high demand, but just as many people are taking to the road as they look for their first post-COVID vacation this summer.

For those in Texas, road-tripping may be easier than you'd think: the state was ranked second-best for road-tripping this summer in a WalletHub study. According to the personal finance site, over two-thirds of people in the U.S. are taking a vacation this summer, and 59% of people said they'd rather drive than fly.

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(Nathan Harris)

Recently selected by Oprah Winfrey for her acclaimed book club, one Austin writer is employing the power of historical fiction to bring attention to contemporary issues of class, race and sexual identity.

Nathan Harris's debut novel, "The Sweetness of Water," is a masterfully realized historical fiction novel that follows the struggles of two newly freed brothers in the fictional town of Old Ox, Georgia. It is set in the antebellum South, a stark moment when emancipated slaves and plantation owners were yoked to the project of reconstruction.

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