Never miss a story
Sign up for our free daily morning email...
...and afternoon text update
×

It's not only 'the most wonderful time of year,' but its also the most risky time of year with COVID-19 meeting flu season. Here's what you need to know about your risk level during the holidays.


Like everything these days, almost all pre-COVID-19 traditions pose at least a small risk in contracting the virus. Since all states have handled the virus differently, gathering with people from out of state has potential to increase the risk.

Though celebrations are certainly going to look different this year, there are tools to help prep for the worst.

Risk can be determined through the number of people, where people are coming from and what their behaviors have been like in the two weeks before the event.

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology created a risk assessment tool to help determine the severity of a gathering based on the county it is in. The live tool shows risk per county, depending on how many people attend.

The risk of 50 people in a gathering are still pretty moderate in Travis County.

For instance, a 10-person gathering in Travis County has a 7% likelihood that one person would test positive afterwards but a 100-person gathering bumps the number up to 50%.

If you and yours are staying home for the holidays, the Texas Medical association ranked holiday activities by level of severity on a scale from one to 10. Anything in your home poses very low risk but the more contact it requires means the risk gets higher.

Attending Thanksgiving dinner with family members is a risk of three points, traveling by plane lands you at five points and attending a large indoor event poses the highest risk at 10 points.

The rankings on the list assume that all attendees are following COVID-19 guidelines and the chart reads "the more people, the closer together, the fewer masks, the more mingling indoors, the longer the time, the more singing and voice projection and the more alcohol—the greater the risk."

Official holiday guidelines can be found on the CDC's holiday guide.

Popular

Citing a 77% decline in new COVID cases nationally since early January, Dr. Martin Makary, a surgical oncologist and professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, expects COVID-19 "will be mostly gone by April, allowing Americans to resume normal life."

Keep Reading Show less

(Bob Daemmrich)

Travis County is the ninth most at-risk county in the nation for severe vaccine deficits and the second most at-risk in the state, according to a study by data science company Cogitativo.

Keep Reading Show less

Late (Tuesday) the City of Austin's outside attorney filed a response to the plaintiffs' (called relators in legal terms) request for a writ of mandamus to force the City Council to amend ballot language for Proposition B.

Proposition B will be on the May 1 ballot as a result of Save Austin Now's petition drive. If voter approved, the resulting ordinance would ban: camping in a public areas, soliciting in designated areas and sitting or lying down on public sidewalks.

Read the full story at The Austin Bulldog.