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(Pikist)

Just when the coronavirus pandemic was sweeping over the state in March, some University of Texas students were faced with a decision: should they continue on their planned and nonrefundable spring break trip to Cabo San Lucas?


Some did, and when they came back, they found that public opinion had turned against them.

In an article released today, Cosmopolitan recounts what the 211 students experienced before and after their infamous trip that became national (and international) news, leading to 62 related COVID-19 cases.

The mostly greek-life students told Cosmopolitan they had a good time on their trip, acting as if the virus was non-existent. But that changed when they returned.

The news spread around campus, then reached the media and started trending on Twitter. Other students began finding photos of those who went on the trip on social media and shaming them publicly. They became the subject of op-eds, CDC studies and media ethics papers.

One student told Cosmopolitan: "I think the Cabo thing made students take the virus more seriously because no one wants to be dragged on Twitter."

Read the full story of testimonies from the trip here.


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