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(Kathy Hutchins / Shutterstock)

Hollywood star James Van Der Beek is the latest in a long line of Californians trading the bright lights for the blue skies of the Lone Star State.


The "Dawson's Creek" star announced on Instagram that he is "onto the next big adventure," moving his family from Beverly Hills to Austin.

Kimberly Van Der Beek, the actor's wife, said in an August episode of "The Make Down" podcast that the family was moving to the Austin area to "get out of the concrete jungle for a little bit." The couple, along with their five young children and four dogs, embarked on a 10-day road trip to their new home state.

The Van Der Beeks join the ranks of other celebrities that call Austin home like Matthew McConaughey and Elijah Wood.

It's not just Hollywood stars that are fleeing California's high cost of living and taxes. According to a 2020 Texas Relocation Report published by Texas Realtors, more than 86,000 California residents moved to Texas in 2019—the most of any other state. The relocation rate has increased by 36.4% since 2017.


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