Popular podcaster—and new Austin resident—Joe Rogan canceled all podcast episodes for this week just days after the controversial music artist Kanye West teased that he would be on the show.


The cancellation of this week's podcast episodes comes after Rogan's producer Jamie Vernon tested positive for COVID-19. On Instagram, Rogan said he and the rest of his team had tested negative. Rogan also said he had not seen Vernon in nine days, and his staff would be tested every day to make sure they did not contract the virus.

While Rogan did not mention the guests of the upcoming episodes that were canceled, West tweeted screenshots of a FaceTime call with Rogan, which referred to West being a guest on the podcast this Friday.

West has not publicly responded to the cancellation.

The rapper icon first mentioned he wanted to be on the podcast on Twitter Oct. 12. This would mean West would fly from his Calabasas home to Rogan's new Austin podcast studio, as many guests on the podcast have done already.

West made news in July for launching his candidacy for U.S. president. While his name will not appear on most ballots, he is still encouraging fans to write his name in.

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The challenge for all of us this Thanksgiving is letting go of what we've lost in this tough year and treasure what we still have.

We at Austonia are thankful for you. Since we launched our site in April, we've done our best to connect you to Austin, with stories ranging from the important to the delightfully superficial. Your response has been strong and we are grateful.

At this time of thanks, we have a variety of stories for you. Laura Figi writes about "a greener holiday," food trends, and Friday shopping. Emma Freer writes about a nearby annual Native American heritage celebration. And Roberto Ontiveros brings us a thoughtful piece that looks at the human toll of Austin's gentrification—the often painful flip side to having shiny new bars, restaurants, and apartments—in this case it's displacement of the Black community on East 11th Street. Finally, we ask you how you're celebrating the holiday this year.

Our best to you and your loved ones!

—The Austonia Team

You can now buy earrings designed by UT students at Kendra Scott

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Aztec dancers perform as part of the virtual grand finale of the Sacred Springs Power on Nov. 21.

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(Isabella Lopes/Austonia)
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(Marco Verch/CC)

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