(UT Moody College of Communication)

Jack-of-all-trades, actor, Minister of Culture and author Matthew McConaughey is considering adding another high-profile notch to his belt: a run for Texas governor.


On "The Hugh Hewitt Show" Tuesday, the 51-year-old Texas-native stated that he might be interested in the position, that is, when the dust settles and the political climate is able to stabilize.

"That wouldn't be up to me. It would be up to the people more than it would me," McConaughey said. "Look, politics seems to be a broken business to me right now and when politics redefines its purpose, I could be a hell of a lot more interested."

Gov. Greg Abbott will be up for reelection in 2022.

McConaughey would not be the first celebrity to run for office by any means. Arnold Schwarzenegger was elected governor of California in 2003, Kanye West ran for president this year and Donald Trump, former host of "The Apprentice," is finishing his presidential term this year.

McConaughey said with a new president in office, the country needs time to move forward.

"I want to get behind personal values to rebind our social contracts with each other as Americans, as people again," McConaughey said. "Coming out of the election right now, we've got to stabilize. This country's got to stabilize first before we start to say okay, here's how we're marching out of this together."

When Trump was elected in 2016, McConaughey said that he had friends that were in denial about his election.

"I remember saying well look, regardless of his politics, in the very first, just the first question, what do we say in America is successful? What do we give credit and respect? Well, the top two things are money and fame," McConaughey said. "I said guys, just on a very base level, Trump has those, so I don't know why we should be so surprised that he got elected."

Nothing is set in stone yet but a McConaughey ticket might just be alright, alright, alright.


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