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Austin is no stranger to growth, rapidly at that. According to a recent LinkedIn report, Austin's population is growing faster than you can say, "Howdy y'all," making it the city with the most newcomers in the U.S. this year.

The data compiled by LinkedIn was based on its 174 million U.S. users and showed that moves were most popular from April 2020 to October 2020.

Austin topped the list of 10 cities with the highest growth rates, charting that for every person to leave Austin, 1.53 people came in. Right behind Austin, Phoenix, Arizona, tracked 1.48 new residents for everyone that left.

Austin was also not the only Texas city on the list: Dallas ranked seventh, with 1.35 new residents for everyone that left.

Austin has received a number of accolades this year: The Wall Street Journal called Austin a "magnet" for jobs, it was named the second-highest college town in the U.S. and the number one tech town in the U.S.

Most residents are coming from big cities, looking for a break from the high costs of living and taxes that large metro areas are famous for.

Plus, everyone is doing it, with major celebrities, like Joe Rogan and James Van Der Beek, and major companies, like Tesla and Oracle, announcing moves to Austin.

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