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(Austonia)

Last week the City Council voted to consider the renaming of streets, parks and other locations in Austin that are reminiscent of slavery or racism. So this week, we asked you, "Do you think the city of Austin should change its name?" The name originates from Stephen F. Austin, known slavery supporter. A vast majority of readers voted the name should stay.


Of 169 readers who voted, a whopping 91% voted "No," that the city should keep its name, indicating in the comments that the name is part of a history that cannot be erased, and that it is also its own brand - not immediately associated with Stephen F. Austin.

"Austin has a brand that is admired worldwide. The name and brand are not associated with racism, slavery, or white supremacy, despite the realities of its namesake, Stephen F Austin."

Only eight people voted "Yes" to the city changing its name, citing the name represents racism.

"If it is upsetting to people, I have no problems changing it."

And lastly, seven readers voted "Unsure."

"Consistency is key - if parks, street names are being changed, then why not cities? However, it's history, and preserving these names could serve as a reminder of behavior we should not model based on the learnings of our past. Failures make us stronger. To erase names will erase history and the key learnings."

Want to participate in future polls? Weekly polls are only available to Austonia's newsletter subscribers. Sign up below, before the next poll on Wednesday.



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Election Day: What you need to know for the primary runoffs today

(Austonia)

Come later tonight, Texans will officially know who will be on the ballot for the November general election.

In Texas, candidates must win at least 50% of the vote to be elected. In the March primaries where the top candidate only received a plurality of votes, a runoff is being held. Voters will decide on the candidates to represent their party in the November general election. Just like the March primaries, voters will choose which party they'd like to vote in. Then based on location, each ballot will show which races are in a runoff.

Here's everything you need to know before heading to the polls.

Know before you go

The registration period for this election has passed; check if you're registered to vote here.

The polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. As long as you're in line by 7 p.m., you can vote.

You'll need a valid photo ID to present once you're at a polling location.

Here is where you can vote in Travis County.

View wait times at polling locations here.

Races to watch in Travis County:

Statewide

Lieutenant Governor

  • Republican: Incumbent Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick won his primary in March.
  • Democratic: Mike Collier and Michelle Beckley are vying to be the Democrat candidate on the ballot.
Attorney General
  • Republican: Incumbent AG Ken Paxton is fighting for his seat against George P. Bush.
  • Democratic: Rochelle Garza and Joe Jaworski will face off to be the Democratic candidate in this race.

View all the statewide races on the ballot here.

U.S. House of Representatives

View the district you live in here.

District 21

  • Republican: Incumbent Chip Roy won his primary in March.
  • Democratic: Claudia Andreana Zapata and Ricardo Villarreal are hoping to secure this vote.
District 35
  • Republican: Dan McQueen and Michael Rodriguez are going head to head to be the Republican candidate in this race.
  • Democratic: Former Austin council member Greg Casar won this race in March.
Texas House

District 19

  • Republican: Ellen Troxclair and Justin Berry are vying to be the Republican candidate in this race.
  • Democratic: Pam Baggett won her primary in March.