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(Austonia)

The land use code has been a controversial subject, as it determines how land can be used in the city, including the types, sizes and locations of new buildings.


As the Nov. 3 election approaches, many Austin City Council candidates are taking a stance on what to do with the code. We asked Austonia newsletter readers if they supported the current draft, and the majority voted "No."

Of the 60 readers who responded, 90% voted against the current draft of the code. Opponents commented that they disapprove of increased density.

"They are changing land codes with intention of making more affordable homes but that isn't really what it does. In our neighborhood, builders can take lots, make more dense housing, but then just give money into a fund for affordable hous[ing]... thus creating more dense neighborhoods without creating more affordable housing. ... So we feel the pain with more traffic, etc., but doesn't actually make it more affordable for this neighborhood."

On the other hand, 10% voted in favor of the current draft. Some readers wrote that increased density is a good thing.

"We need to find ways for more people to live in the city. This means finding ways to fit more than strip malls and single family homes in as many neighborhoods as possible. I would like the [land development code] to change even *more* than what's proposed but I also believe incrementalism is the name of the game."

Next week, you can expect a story from Austonia about the land-use code.

Want to participate in future polls? Weekly polls are only accessible to Austonia's newsletter subscribers. Sign up below, before the next poll on Wednesday.

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