(Michael Vadon/Phil Roeder)

Despite all odds, there will be a final presidential debate Thursday before Election Day on Nov. 3. The debate will start at 8 p.m. where the candidates will be asked to respond to six topics: COVID-19, race issues, climate change, American families, national security and leadership.


The last debate on Sept. 29 was an untethered, wacky look at incumbent Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden, chock-full of insults, yelling over each other and interrupting the moderator. So the internet did what it does best: made it into a meme.

Here's how to have fun while watching the next debate.

Play a drinking or bingo game

This Washingtonian game will have you drinking anytime Trump makes a false claim about COVID-19 or complains about voter fraud, Biden starts a sentence with the word "look" or "folks," and either candidate says "United States of America" or takes a direct jab at their opponent. While the game recommends shotgunning a beer before the start of the debate, anyone who watched the last one will know that isn't necessary. In fact, if you're not careful, you might want to tap out after the first half hour. As a bonus rule, you are supposed to chug your drink anytime you've lost track of what either candidate is talking about.

So yeah, you're liable to get sloshed.

If you're not drinking, you can also download a bingo card with similar phrases and play along that way.

For a more interactive experience

Porch Drinking's debate game is much more elaborate than the Washingtonian's and certainly more distracting. This game will have you take a sip every time Trump says "fake news," "yuge" or "anything creepy about women" and Biden says "mask," "malarkey" or "anything creepy about women."

The fun comes in with the specifics of this game, like drinking while reciting the Pledge of Allegiance in your head if neither candidate is wearing a flag on their lapel; putting a mask on someone if one of the candidates mentions a COVID-19 keyword and leaving it on until the next one is said; washing your hands for 20 seconds every time hydroxychloroquine is mentioned ond having a friend hand you a drink every time a candidate mentions socialism.

The beauty is in this game's completely random actions to perform, many of which don't even include booze.

If you’re watching the debate with your kids

Though people under 18 cannot vote in the election, a lot of young people have opinions about and a stake in the election. Talking about the election with kids could inspire them to take interest and make informed decisions in the long run. Our White House recommends, if your kids are old enough, having a political discussion. To start, the organization recommends parents and kids write down a list of issues they want to the hear the candidates talk about before the debate before talking through them together.

The Washington Post also offers a kid's guide to meeting the candidates, so kids can truly make up their own minds.

Your kids may not be able to vote officially, but they can make a choice in Nickolodeon's Kids Pick the President poll. Voting starts Oct. 28 and you can view results on Nov. 5.
(MangoNic/Shutterstock)

Before the pandemic started, Adult Care of Austin on Menchaca Road didn't offer telemedicine appointments.

Now, the private practice conducts almost all of its visits virtually, either over the phone or on HIPAA-compliant video platforms.

Dr. Steven Dobberfuhl, an internal medicine physician, said telemedicine saved his practice—and has been a boon to his patients, around 75% of whom are 65 years or older and at high risk of contracting COVID-19.

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(Tito's Handmade Vodka)

Ingredients:

  • 750 mL Tito's Handmade Vodka
  • 1 1/2 cup toasted pecans
Directions: Toast pecans in a 350°F oven until they become aromatic (about 5 minutes). Let pecans cool, drop them into a resealable jar, and fill with Tito's Handmade Vodka. Store in a cool, dark place for 1 month, if you can wait that long.

The challenge for all of us this Thanksgiving is letting go of what we've lost in this tough year and treasure what we still have.

We at Austonia are thankful for you. Since we launched our site in April, we've done our best to connect you to Austin, with stories ranging from the important to the delightfully superficial. Your response has been strong and we are grateful.

At this time of thanks, we have a variety of stories for you. Laura Figi writes about "a greener holiday," food trends, and Friday shopping. Emma Freer writes about a nearby annual Native American heritage celebration. And Roberto Ontiveros brings us a thoughtful piece that looks at the human toll of Austin's gentrification—the often painful flip side to having shiny new bars, restaurants, and apartments—in this case it's displacement of the Black community on East 11th Street. Finally, we ask you how you're celebrating the holiday this year.

Our best to you and your loved ones!

—The Austonia Team

You can now buy earrings designed by UT students at Kendra Scott

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Aztec dancers perform as part of the virtual grand finale of the Sacred Springs Power on Nov. 21.

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But this year's event, like so many others, occurred online. Sixty Native American dancers competed via streamed performances on Saturday, and vendors, singers and storytellers submitted videos for the audience to view at their leisure.

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(Isabella Lopes/Austonia)
Austin's East 11th Street, with its brunch crowds and boutiques, is a slick and shining example of the gentrification that has taken over what was once designated by the city as the old "negro district."
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