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(The Austin Bulldog)

Dana DeBeauvoir, Travis County Clerk for the past 35 years, announced last week that she won't seek reelection. She plans to step down before her term ends, likely at the end of January. "It's time," she said.


DeBeauvoir oversees elections and acts as the county's chief custodian of public records, supervising a staff of 145, as well as hundreds of poll workers. First elected in 1986, she oversaw the digitization of massive troves of public records and spearheaded a years-long collaboration between computer scientists and election officials to make elections more secure—an effort that won national recognition.

Travis County currently employs voting machines that combine touchscreen technology with an auditable paper trail—a method widely regarded as the gold standard for election security.

As recently as August 26, DeBeauvoir had told the Bulldog that she would seek reelection. In an interview, she reflected on election security, turnout, and public confidence in the electoral process. In a follow-up November 16, she explained why she had a change of heart about running again and elaborated on the qualities she'd like to see in her successor.

Read the full Q&A with retiring county clerk Dana DeBeauvoir here.

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