Never miss a story
Sign up for our free daily morning email...
...and afternoon text update
×
(Sasaki)

The 97-acre mixed-use development slated for 4700 East Riverside Drive has a new name—River Park—and master plan that includes the addition of a 12-acre retail center.


The developer behind River Park, Presidium, shared its vision for the project, which will include more than 400 affordable units as well as 10 million square feet of offices, shops, hotels, parks and homes.

Bordered by the Roy G. Guerrero Colorado River Metro Park and Country Club Creek, the development will feature access to the Ann and Roy Butler Hike and Bike Trailer and more than 30 acres of publicly parkland and urban trails. It will also be served by a forthcoming light rail line planned under Project Connect, the $7.1 billion transit overhaul that Austin voters recently chose to fund.

"The location and size of River Park provides a unique opportunity to solve and address some of Austin's biggest challenges such as housing supply, affordability, connectivity and mobility—all on an urban-infill site within five minutes of downtown," Presidium Director of Development Michael Piano said in a statement Monday.

River Park is scheduled to be built in phases over the next two decades, with a preliminary start date planned for 2023.

Austin City Council voted 6-3 in October 2019 to approve zoning changes for the site, which is at the intersection of Riverside and South Pleasant Valley Road, after months of controversy.

Members of Defend Our Hoodz—a local advocacy organization that the Austin Police Department has said overlaps with the Mike Ramos Brigade, a local antifa group—protested outside the homes of Council Member Sabino "Pio" Renteria and Michael Whellan, an attorney whose firm represents the developer.

The University of Texas at Austin student government voted to approve a resolution asking the council to vote against the zoning change or to provide more affordable student housing in the area, which is home to many lower-cost apartments.

Council members acknowledged concerns that the project would worsen gentrification in one of the few remaining affordable urban core neighborhoods. But they also conceded that development was inevitable.

"Rejecting this rezoning request will not deflate the redevelopment pressure facing this area," Council Member Natasha Harper-Madison said at the time. "It's a difficult but very real truth."

Popular

(Pexels)

The Texas Department of State Health Services will allocate 332,750 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to 212 providers this week, with the bulk assigned to hub providers that are focused on widespread community distribution events. Six of those providers are in Travis County.

With the latest allocation of 16,450 sent to Travis County this week, the county will have received 104,275 doses of the vaccine. Local public health officials estimate that there are 285,000 area residents who fall in the 1A and 1B priority groups, meaning that around 37% of them should have access to doses seven weeks into the rollout process.

Here's where the latest allotment is going:

Keep Reading Show less

(Shutterstock)

The California exodus has made headlines for several years now, and even more recently, with thousands of West Coasters seeking tax relief, less-expensive real estate and a simpler lifestyle in Texas' capital city.

However, a California man's scathing review of Austin, which was published in Business Insider on Wednesday, reveals that some are less than satisfied with their move.

Keep Reading Show less
(Shutterstock)

Austin may soon be home to a tech plant that would dwarf the Tesla Gigafactory in both investment and job creation.

Samsung Electronics Co. is considering starting construction on a $10 billion memory chip plant in Austin as soon as this year, Bloomberg reported Friday.

Keep Reading Show less