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Editor's Note: This column is part of a dating series where an anonymous Austinite shares a personal story about a date. This one was written by a 22-year-old active dater in Austin.

Dating is an ever-changing roller coaster ride. I like to think I was so conceived in the wrong generation. Or have times just really evolved? I'm talking about back in the day in my parents' generation, without cell phones, when there was no such thing as "sliding into the dm's." If a man wanted to date a woman, his options were to approach her in person and get her landline digits in hopes that no one would eavesdrop on the same line.

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Tinder use soared alongside other popular dating apps during the pandemic and is expected to continue to grow.

It may not come as a surprise that dating app use surged during the pandemic when many had to swap the benefits of in-person dating for on-screen connections. Bumble revenue swelled to $337.2 million in 2020 compared to $275.5 million, Hinge revenue tripled in the same period and Tinder users broke two records from January to March of 2021.

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Editor's Note: This is a column by an active dater in Austin, who asked that her name not be used to tell this story.

I can't take the credit for coining the term "vaxxed and waxed" but I don't think there's a more appropriate theme for summer 2021. Let's talk about it.

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Bumble says that 91% of those surveyed believe that there is no longer a stigma attached to online dating compared to before the COVID-19 pandemic. (Shutterstock)

It's officially dating season if you haven't heard, and that doesn't mean you have to ditch your dating apps.

Two out of three people say they believe you can fall in love before meeting in person, according to a new survey released by Bumble. Bumble, the locally founded online dating app that allows women to make the first move, says its newly released survey "reveals how the pandemic has changed dating" headed into the "summer of love."

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