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Late (Tuesday) the City of Austin's outside attorney filed a response to the plaintiffs' (called relators in legal terms) request for a writ of mandamus to force the City Council to amend ballot language for Proposition B.

Proposition B will be on the May 1 ballot as a result of Save Austin Now's petition drive. If voter approved, the resulting ordinance would ban: camping in a public areas, soliciting in designated areas and sitting or lying down on public sidewalks.

Read the full story at The Austin Bulldog.

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Three registered voters—Linda Durnin, Eric Krohn, and Michael Lovins—who signed the Save Austin Now petition are lead plaintiffs (called relators in legal terms) in identical lawsuits filed with both the Third Court of Appeals and the Texas Supreme Court.

The Original Emergency Petition for Writ of Mandamus filed with the Third Court of Appeals (Case No. 03-21-00075-CV) filed February 16, 2021, asks the court to issue an immediate writ of mandamus that would compel the Austin City Council to adopt the caption contained in the petition as the ballot language. Either that or adopt alternative ballot language that more accurately reflects the primary purpose of the petition.

Read the full story at The Austin Bulldog.

(Pexels)

After several winter storms and six days of subfreezing temperatures, Austin residents can expect details Friday evening about water distribution sites and "substantial improvement" in water service by Monday, although the boil water notice is likely to last into next week, city officials said during an afternoon press conference.

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(Jordan Vonderhaar)

Nathan Ryan is the CEO of Austin-based consulting firm Blue Sky Partners, and a commissioner on Austin's Economic Prosperity Commission. As a commissioner, he contributes to strategy related to job creation and construction in the city. Views are his alone and do not reflect the views of Austonia.

Austin is in the middle of a years-long debate about homelessness. Right now, some are arguing that we should go back to the ban we had in place in early 2019 that made camping, sitting, lying and panhandling punishable by fine or jail. That response greatly oversimplifies the challenge we're dealing with.

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