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Austin Police Department cadets at the restart of academy training in June 2021, following an overhaul of the curriculum (APD)

As the Austin Police Department experiences high 911 response times and an officer shortage, a new study conducted reveals what would be needed to meet an ideal response time.

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A University of Texas football player has been accused of violating Oklahoma's "revenge porn" law. (Texas Football/Twitter)

Texas Longhorns defensive back Ishmael Ibraheem has been suspended from the UT football team after Oklahoma State University police accused the freshman of violating Oklahoma's "revenge porn" law.

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Austin Police Department cadets at the re-start of academy training in June 2021, following an overhaul of the curriculum (APD)

The defeat of Proposition A in the Nov. 2 election repudiates Save Austin Now's plan for a significantly larger police force while leaving considerable uncertainty around the future sizing of the force.

That outcome thrilled progressives, who led the charge against Prop A, while shocking the largely Republican supporters' coalition led by Save Austin Now. At an election night watch party, Save Austin Now supporters learned of the results with disbelief.

For Prop A opponents, the result signals persistent public support for last year's reallocation of public safety resources, as well as skepticism of both the cost and effectiveness of adding hundreds more police. "We know that the safest cities have more resources, not more police," said No Way on Prop A, the political action committee that spearheaded the opposition.

Read the full story at The Austin Bulldog.