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(Bouldin Creek Cafe/Instagram)

For longtime residents, Austin's massive population boom is not new. Seeing small businesses close and big corporations move to Austin in droves was frightening for Leslie Martin, even 20 years ago.

Using a small amount of money she earned by selling antiques, Martin opened a café in the Summer of 2000, feeling that someone had to keep Austin local.

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Dominique Kirven posed while working a pop-up shop at Coconut Club. (Thrifted Feels/Instagram)

Dominique Kirven began thrifting with her mother and grandmother when she was 10 years old, only slowing down as she began working for big-box stores. Kirven left that job, frustrated with "how corrupt the industry is" and the unsustainability of fast fashion, shifting her shopping to smaller, used retailers.

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In addition to the butchery and restaurant, Salt & Time is also a salumeria, meaning it specializes in salami and cured meats. (Salt & Time)

Ben Runkle went vegan when he was 18 after learning about the effects meat production posed to animals and the environment. He was into punk rock at the time, living in the Bay Area in California, surrounded by like-minded people who also abstained from eating meat.

Fast forward more than 10 years later, Runkle co-owns Salt & Time, a butchery and salumeria here in Austin, but he hasn't lost his drive to live sustainably.

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(Dolce Neve)

For Marco Silvestrini, gelato takes him back to his childhood when he and neighborhood kids in a small Italian town would end their day at the local gelato shop. It was part of what made some of the best memories for him.

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