The proposed Tesla factory site is at the intersection of SH 130 and Harold Green Road.

Amid reports that Tesla has already purchased a 2,100-acre site in Southeast Travis County for its proposed "Gigafactory," founder Elon Musk tweeted yesterday that the electric carmaker "has an option to purchase this land, but has not exercised it."


Musk responded on the same thread to add that the company is "considering several options" for its new factory location, even as it applies for economic incentive agreements with Del Valle ISD and Travis County.

The land, at the intersection of SH 130 and Harold Green Road, is owned by the construction supplier Martin Marietta and used as a sand and gravel mining site, according to Tesla's application materials to Del Valle ISD and Travis Central Appraisal District data.

Tesla's application to the school district—which was made public by the Texas Comptroller's office yesterday—proposes building a 4 million- to 5 million-square-foot facility in Southeast Travis County that would ultimately create 5,000 jobs with an average annual salary of nearly $75,000.

In a statement, Del Valle ISD Superintendent Annette Tielle said: "The addition of a company who has the ability to support our community both economically and academically would be advantageous for our students and accelerate our efforts to mentor and develop the workforce of the next generation."

If approved, construction on the "Gigafactory" would begin this fall and operations would start up in late 2021.

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