(The Boring Company)

The Boring Company teased plans Monday to build a tunnel transportation loop beneath Austin.

Tesla's new gigafactory might not be the only Elon Musk project underway in Austin.


The Boring Company is actively hiring in Austin to potentially build a tunnel beneath the city similar to projects already under way in Las Vegas and Los Angeles. Although nothing is official, the company posted Monday on Twitter a link to its job board, which includes eight Austin openings, along with a not-so-subtle message:

If you're not familiar, The Boring Company touts itself as a traffic alternative that relies on tunnels beneath busy cities to allow autonomous vehicles—Teslas, for example—to drive as fast as possible without interference. The vacuum-sealed tunnel could allow vehicles to travel up to 150 miles per hour, with long-term goals to link the tunnels to create a "hyperloop," which could connect cities and enable speeds exceeding 600 mph.

More details, including the cost of this project, have yet to be released. Long term, The Boring Company claims the price to use the tunnel will be similar to the ticket price for traditional public transportation.

It just so happens that Austinites recently approved a tax increase that would partly pay for Project Connect, a $7.1 billion overhaul to the city's public transit system. The project includes a tunnel beneath downtown Austin.

Austin officials have not spoken publicly about The Boring Company's potential project or how a proposed tunnel might complement Project Connect.

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