(Texas Medical Association)

The Texas Medical Association created a chart showing the relative risk of different activities amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The full version includes moderate-high and high risk categories as well.

Six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, many Austinites still have questions about the relative risk of different activities. Is it safe yet to see a movie, travel by plane, send one's children back to school, book a hotel stay or play tennis?


The aforementioned activities are listed in descending order of riskiness, according to a chart created by members of the Texas Medical Association's COVID-19 task force and committee on infectious disease earlier this summer.

The Texas Medical Association released a chart organizing activities by the level of COVID-19 risk they pose to participants. (Texas Medical Association)

Physicians provided input on a variety of activities, working from the assumption that participants would take as many safety precautions as possible in any given situation.

Low- to moderate-risk activities include camping, visiting the doctor and returning to work at an office building, according to the chart. Eating inside at a restaurant, playing football, hugging a friend and working out at a gym are higher risk.

Under current state orders, most businesses are allowed to be open, if at limited capacity. In late June, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott increased restaurant capacity limits to 75%.

But bars and other operations that earn more than 51% of their total revenue from alcohol sales must remain closed—for now.

Abbott tweeted on Monday that he "hope[s] to provide updates next week about next steps" regarding state orders.

City of Austin and Travis County orders, meanwhile, continue to prohibit gatherings of more than 10 people and requires people to wear a mask when they are in an outdoor public space and unable to social distance.

(Photo courtesy of Marisela Maddox)

Marisela Maddox's two children complete their online schooling from home, a reason she decided she needed to bring in extra help.

Marisela Maddox is no stranger to the nanny game, having hired at-home caregivers in the past to help with her two children, ages 5 and 10.

Keep Reading Show less

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 oz Tito's Handmade Vodka
  • 1/2 oz simple syrup
  • 1 1/2 oz tonic water
  • 1 lime, squeezed
  • 5 grapes, muddled

Directions: Muddle grapes in a shaker. Add Tito's Handmade Vodka, simple syrup, lime, and ice, then shake vigorously. Strain over fresh ice and top with tonic water.

(Eva Rinaldi/Creative Commons)

An Austin man was sentenced to 30 months in prison for stalking and sending threatening letters and emails to pop star Taylor Swift's former record label.

Keep Reading Show less

In a historic win for college athletes and voter advocates, led by former NBA champion and Austinite Chris Bosh, the NCAA voted this week to require an annual November Election Day "off day" for Division 1 student athletes to vote or volunteer in election activities if they choose.

Keep Reading Show less

Austin Trail of Lights will take place this holiday season.

The Austin Trail of Lights—an annual event that transforms Zilker Park into a winter wonderland, featuring more than 60 displays and two million lights—will take place this holiday season, despite the pandemic.

Keep Reading Show less
(Office of the Governor)

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced that restaurants and other businesses can expand their capacity to 75% starting on Monday in most parts of the state.

In most of the state, businesses that had been limited to 50% capacity—including retail stores, restaurants, office buildings, libraries, museums and gyms—can move to 75% capacity starting on Monday, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced on Thursday. Bars must remain closed.

Keep Reading Show less